Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation in short-time testing

Shun Takagi, Shizuo Sakamoto, Taishi Midorikawa, Masayuki Konishi, Toshihito Katsumura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) rate and the exercise intensity that elicits MFO (FATmax-intensity) were designed to evaluate fat metabolism capacity and to provide individuals with a target exercise intensity during prolonged exercise. However, the previous methods of determining FATmax-intensity were time-consuming. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of FATmax-intensity determined by short-time testing. Nine healthy young men performed ramp exercise, in a short-time test, until exhaustion and 5 constant-load exercises of 60 min each at individual FATmax-intensity determined by ramp protocol (FATmax-intensity(R)), FATmax-intensity(R) ± 5% of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and FATmax-intensity(R) ± 10%VO2peak. FATmax-intensity was determined among 5 trials at points of early exercise (10 min) and prolonged exercise (60 min) to evaluate the validity of FATmax-intensity(R). Ten minutes after starting constant-load exercise, FATmax-intensity(R) showed the highest fat oxidation among 5 trials, even though MFO by ramp protocol was overestimated. Therefore, it may be useful for evaluation of fat metabolism to include the measurement of the FATmax-intensity in a routine ramp test. However, because FATmax-intensity(R) did not elicit the highest fat oxidation among 5 trials of 60 min each after starting constant-load exercise, FATmax-intensity(R) may not be effective for prolonged exercise training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-182
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan

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Keywords

  • exercise testing
  • fat metabolism
  • hormonal response
  • ramp exercise
  • steady-state exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation in short-time testing. / Takagi, Shun; Sakamoto, Shizuo; Midorikawa, Taishi; Konishi, Masayuki; Katsumura, Toshihito.

In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.2014, p. 175-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takagi, Shun ; Sakamoto, Shizuo ; Midorikawa, Taishi ; Konishi, Masayuki ; Katsumura, Toshihito. / Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation in short-time testing. In: Journal of Sports Sciences. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 175-182.
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