Development of a high-speed real-time polymerase chain reaction system using a circulating water-based rapid heat-exchange

Hideyuki Terazono, Hiroyuki Takei, Akihiro Hattori, Kenji Yasuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful technique to detect microorganisms, viruses, or cells by amplifying a single copy or a few copies of a fragment of a particular DNA sequence. To reduce acquisition time, it is necessary to decrease the temperature transition time between denaturation and extension. We have developed a simple rapid real-time microlitter-sample droplet PCR system accomplished by the rapid liquidbased heat-exchange of sample droplets by quick switching of two circulating hot waters of denaturation and extension, a microlitter-sized droplet and a thin-film aluminum chip. Using this system, rapid PCR amplification of a set of droplets lined up on an aluminum chip was conducted successfully as shown by the increase in fluorescence intensity, and was accomplished within 3.5 min in 40 cycles of 1 s denaturation and 3 s extension reaction, which is one magnitude faster than conventional fast PCR systems. This method allows the rapid detection of DNA fragments and has a possibility for measuring multiple samples simultaneously in a miniaturized microfluidic chip.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJapanese Journal of Applied Physics
Volume49
Issue number6 PART 2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jun
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

polymerase chain reaction
Polymerase chain reaction
Denaturation
biopolymer denaturation
high speed
heat
chips
water
Water
deoxyribonucleic acid
fragments
aluminum
Aluminum
DNA sequences
viruses
microorganisms
Viruses
Microfluidics
Microorganisms
Superconducting transition temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Development of a high-speed real-time polymerase chain reaction system using a circulating water-based rapid heat-exchange. / Terazono, Hideyuki; Takei, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji.

In: Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 49, No. 6 PART 2, 06.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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