Development of roll-over support system with EMG control for cancer bone metastasis patients

Takeshi Ando, Jun Okamoto, Masakatsu G. Fujie

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Currently, over seven million people die of cancer each year; some of whom suffer from pain caused by bone metastasis. In their final stages of life, the pain is such that they cannot even roll over, one of the activities of daily life. With this in mind, in this research, we aim to develop equipment for patients with cancer bone metastasis to support roll-overs in terminal care. Specifically, the EMG signal, which is the input signal of the equipment, is discussed in this paper. The activities of four muscles affecting trunk movement were monitored during the process of rolling over. Following an EMG experiment with four subjects, the internal abdominal oblique (IO) muscle was seen to be active in the early stages of roll-over motion, although IO muscle was relatively prevalent in previous works. If we support roll-over at this point, the patient feels no pain, because the timing is detected before the strongest burden movement, which involves buoying the trunk and rotating the pelvis. Hence, the EMG signal of the IO muscle is suitable for the input of the signal to support roll-overs.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation
    Pages1244-1249
    Number of pages6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    Event2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA'07 - Rome
    Duration: 2007 Apr 102007 Apr 14

    Other

    Other2007 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA'07
    CityRome
    Period07/4/1007/4/14

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Software
    • Control and Systems Engineering

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