Diamond surface conductivity: Properties, devices, and sensors

Christopher I. Pakes, Jose A. Garrido, Hiroshi Kawarada

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    33 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Hydrogen termination of diamond lowers its ionization energy, driving electron transfer from the valence band into an adsorbed water layer or to a strong molecular acceptor. This gives rise to p-type surface conductivity with holes confined to a subsurface layer of a few nanometers thickness. The transfer doping mechanism, the electronic behavior of the resulting hole accumulation layer, and the development of robust field-effect transistor (FET) devices using this platform are reviewed. An alternative method of modulating the hole carrier density has been developed based upon an electrolyte-gate architecture. The operation of the resulting solution-gated FET architecture in two contemporary applications will be described: the charge state control of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and biosensing. Despite 25 years of work in this area, our knowledge of surface conductivity of diamond continues to develop.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)542-548
    Number of pages7
    JournalMRS Bulletin
    Volume39
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Diamond
    Diamonds
    diamonds
    Field effect transistors
    conductivity
    sensors
    Sensors
    field effect transistors
    Ionization potential
    Valence bands
    Electrolytes
    Vacancies
    Carrier concentration
    Hydrogen
    electron transfer
    Nitrogen
    platforms
    Doping (additives)
    electrolytes
    valence

    Keywords

    • Devices
    • Diamond
    • Electronic material

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Materials Science(all)
    • Condensed Matter Physics
    • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

    Cite this

    Diamond surface conductivity : Properties, devices, and sensors. / Pakes, Christopher I.; Garrido, Jose A.; Kawarada, Hiroshi.

    In: MRS Bulletin, Vol. 39, No. 6, 2014, p. 542-548.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Pakes, Christopher I. ; Garrido, Jose A. ; Kawarada, Hiroshi. / Diamond surface conductivity : Properties, devices, and sensors. In: MRS Bulletin. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 542-548.
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