Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals the effects of different cooling temperatures on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within human skeletal muscle

O. Yanagisawa, T. Fukubayashi

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    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of local cooling on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within muscle at different cooling temperatures. Materials and methods: Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted (DW) images of the leg (seven males) were obtained before and after 30 min cooling (0, 10, and 20 °C), and after a 30 min recovery period. Two types of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; ADC1, reflecting both water diffusion and perfusion within muscle, and ADC2, approximating the true water diffusion coefficient) of the ankle dorsiflexors were calculated from DW images. T2-weighted images were also obtained to calculate T2 values of the ankle dorsiflexors. The skin temperature was measured before, during, and after cooling. Results: Both ADC values significantly decreased after cooling under all cooling conditions; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (ADC1: -36% at 0 °C, -27.8% at 10 °C, and -22.6% at 20 °C; ADC2: -26% at 0 °C, -21.1% at 10 °C, and -14.6% at 20 °C). These significant decreases were maintained during the recovery period. Conversely, the T2 value showed no significant changes. Under all cooling conditions, skin temperature significantly decreased during cooling; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (-74.8% at 0 °C, -51.1% at 10 °C, and -26.8% at 20 °C). Decreased skin temperatures were not restored to pre-cooling values during the recovery period under any cooling conditions. Conclusion: Local cooling decreased the water diffusion and perfusion within muscle with decreased skin temperature; the rates of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used. These decreases were maintained for 30 min after cooling.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)874-880
    Number of pages7
    JournalClinical Radiology
    Volume65
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010 Nov

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    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Skeletal Muscle
    Perfusion
    Skin Temperature
    Temperature
    Water
    Ankle
    Muscles
    Leg
    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

    Cite this

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    title = "Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals the effects of different cooling temperatures on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within human skeletal muscle",
    abstract = "Aim: To evaluate the effect of local cooling on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within muscle at different cooling temperatures. Materials and methods: Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted (DW) images of the leg (seven males) were obtained before and after 30 min cooling (0, 10, and 20 °C), and after a 30 min recovery period. Two types of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; ADC1, reflecting both water diffusion and perfusion within muscle, and ADC2, approximating the true water diffusion coefficient) of the ankle dorsiflexors were calculated from DW images. T2-weighted images were also obtained to calculate T2 values of the ankle dorsiflexors. The skin temperature was measured before, during, and after cooling. Results: Both ADC values significantly decreased after cooling under all cooling conditions; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (ADC1: -36{\%} at 0 °C, -27.8{\%} at 10 °C, and -22.6{\%} at 20 °C; ADC2: -26{\%} at 0 °C, -21.1{\%} at 10 °C, and -14.6{\%} at 20 °C). These significant decreases were maintained during the recovery period. Conversely, the T2 value showed no significant changes. Under all cooling conditions, skin temperature significantly decreased during cooling; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (-74.8{\%} at 0 °C, -51.1{\%} at 10 °C, and -26.8{\%} at 20 °C). Decreased skin temperatures were not restored to pre-cooling values during the recovery period under any cooling conditions. Conclusion: Local cooling decreased the water diffusion and perfusion within muscle with decreased skin temperature; the rates of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used. These decreases were maintained for 30 min after cooling.",
    author = "O. Yanagisawa and T. Fukubayashi",
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    AU - Yanagisawa, O.

    AU - Fukubayashi, T.

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    N2 - Aim: To evaluate the effect of local cooling on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within muscle at different cooling temperatures. Materials and methods: Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted (DW) images of the leg (seven males) were obtained before and after 30 min cooling (0, 10, and 20 °C), and after a 30 min recovery period. Two types of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; ADC1, reflecting both water diffusion and perfusion within muscle, and ADC2, approximating the true water diffusion coefficient) of the ankle dorsiflexors were calculated from DW images. T2-weighted images were also obtained to calculate T2 values of the ankle dorsiflexors. The skin temperature was measured before, during, and after cooling. Results: Both ADC values significantly decreased after cooling under all cooling conditions; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (ADC1: -36% at 0 °C, -27.8% at 10 °C, and -22.6% at 20 °C; ADC2: -26% at 0 °C, -21.1% at 10 °C, and -14.6% at 20 °C). These significant decreases were maintained during the recovery period. Conversely, the T2 value showed no significant changes. Under all cooling conditions, skin temperature significantly decreased during cooling; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (-74.8% at 0 °C, -51.1% at 10 °C, and -26.8% at 20 °C). Decreased skin temperatures were not restored to pre-cooling values during the recovery period under any cooling conditions. Conclusion: Local cooling decreased the water diffusion and perfusion within muscle with decreased skin temperature; the rates of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used. These decreases were maintained for 30 min after cooling.

    AB - Aim: To evaluate the effect of local cooling on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within muscle at different cooling temperatures. Materials and methods: Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted (DW) images of the leg (seven males) were obtained before and after 30 min cooling (0, 10, and 20 °C), and after a 30 min recovery period. Two types of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; ADC1, reflecting both water diffusion and perfusion within muscle, and ADC2, approximating the true water diffusion coefficient) of the ankle dorsiflexors were calculated from DW images. T2-weighted images were also obtained to calculate T2 values of the ankle dorsiflexors. The skin temperature was measured before, during, and after cooling. Results: Both ADC values significantly decreased after cooling under all cooling conditions; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (ADC1: -36% at 0 °C, -27.8% at 10 °C, and -22.6% at 20 °C; ADC2: -26% at 0 °C, -21.1% at 10 °C, and -14.6% at 20 °C). These significant decreases were maintained during the recovery period. Conversely, the T2 value showed no significant changes. Under all cooling conditions, skin temperature significantly decreased during cooling; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (-74.8% at 0 °C, -51.1% at 10 °C, and -26.8% at 20 °C). Decreased skin temperatures were not restored to pre-cooling values during the recovery period under any cooling conditions. Conclusion: Local cooling decreased the water diffusion and perfusion within muscle with decreased skin temperature; the rates of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used. These decreases were maintained for 30 min after cooling.

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