DNA-inspired hierarchical polymer design: Electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in concert

Sean T. Hemp, Timothy Edward Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nucleic acids and proteins, two of nature's biopolymers, assemble into complex structures to achieve desired biological functions and inspire the design of synthetic macromolecules containing a wide variety of noncovalent interactions including electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. Researchers have incorporated DNA nucleobases into a wide variety of synthetic monomers/polymers achieving stimuli-responsive materials, supramolecular assemblies, and well-controlled macromolecules. Recently, scientists utilized both electrostatics and complementary hydrogen bonding to orthogonally functionalize a polymer backbone through supramolecular assembly. Diverse macromolecules with noncovalent interactions will create materials with properties necessary for biomedical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-39
Number of pages11
JournalMacromolecular Bioscience
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hydrogen Bonding
Static Electricity
Macromolecules
Electrostatics
Hydrogen bonds
Polymers
DNA
Biopolymers
Nucleic Acids
Nucleic acids
Research Personnel
Coulomb interactions
Monomers
Proteins

Keywords

  • Hydrogen bonding
  • Molecular recognition
  • Nucleobases
  • Supramolecular structures
  • Templates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

DNA-inspired hierarchical polymer design : Electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in concert. / Hemp, Sean T.; Long, Timothy Edward.

In: Macromolecular Bioscience, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 29-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hemp, Sean T. ; Long, Timothy Edward. / DNA-inspired hierarchical polymer design : Electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in concert. In: Macromolecular Bioscience. 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 29-39.
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