Dual-task repetition alters event-related brain potentials and task performance

Tetsuo Kida, Takeshi Kaneda, Yoshiaki Nishihira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We examined the modulation of event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and the accuracy of sensori-motor coordination on short-term repetition of the concurrent performance of a somatosensory discrimination (oddball) task and a visuo-motor tracking task. Methods: The subjects concurrently performed visuomotor tracking and somatosensory oddball tasks. In the dual-task condition, the subjects performed the visuomotor tracking and somatosensory oddball tasks concurrently for about an hour. In the oddball-only condition, they performed just the oddball task for the same period. Results: Tracking performance improved with task repetition. The amplitude of the P300 elicited by somatosensory stimulation in the oddball-only condition decreased significantly with task repetition, whereas in the dual-task condition, it showed a complex pattern of change. The earlier responses were decreased in amplitude in the dual-task condition compared to the oddball-only condition, and gradually decreased with task repetition in both conditions. Conclusions: Dynamic changes in ERPs and task performance with dual-task repetition support the idea that dual-task repetition produces changes in resource allocation following the automation of stimulus processing in addition to so-called habituation. Significance: This study also provides evidence for use of ERP amplitudes as physiological indices of functionally different types of resources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1123-1130
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume123
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jun

Fingerprint

Task Performance and Analysis
Evoked Potentials
Brain
Resource Allocation
Automation

Keywords

  • Dual task
  • Learning
  • P300
  • Practice
  • Processing resource

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Dual-task repetition alters event-related brain potentials and task performance. / Kida, Tetsuo; Kaneda, Takeshi; Nishihira, Yoshiaki.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 123, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 1123-1130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kida, Tetsuo ; Kaneda, Takeshi ; Nishihira, Yoshiaki. / Dual-task repetition alters event-related brain potentials and task performance. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2012 ; Vol. 123, No. 6. pp. 1123-1130.
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