DWWA, a Novel Protein Containing Two WW Domains and an IQ Motif, Is Required for Scission of the Residual Cytoplasmic Bridge during Cytokinesis in Dictyostelium

Akira Nagasaki, Taro Q.P. Uyeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have identified a novel gene, dwwA, which is required for cytokinesis of Dictyostelium cells on solid surfaces. Its product, Dd WW domain containing protein A (DWWA), contains several motifs, including two WW domains, an IQ motif, a C2 domain, and a proline-rich region. On substrates, cells lacking dwwA were multinucleated and larger and flatter than wild-type cells due to their frequent inability to sever the cytoplasmic bridge connecting daughter cells after mitosis. When cultured in suspension, however, dwwA-null cells seemed to carry out cytokinesis normally via a process not driven by the shearing force arising from agitation of the culture. GFP-DWWA localized to the cell cortex and nucleus; analysis of the distributions of various truncation mutants revealed that the N-terminal half of the protein, which contains the C2 domain, is required for the cortical localization of DWWA. The IQ motif of DWWA binds calmodulin in vitro. Given that the scission process is also defective in calmodulin knockdown cells cultured on substrates (Liu et al., 1992), we propose that DWWA's multiple binding domains enable it to function as an adaptor protein, facilitating the scission process through the regulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and/or modulation of membrane dynamics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-446
Number of pages12
JournalMolecular biology of the cell
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Feb
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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