Dynamic distortion of visual position representation around moving objects

Katsumi Watanabe, Kenji Yokoi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relative visual positions of briefly flashed stimuli are systematically modified in the presence of motion signals (R. Nijhawan, 2002; D. Whitney, 2002). Previously, we investigated the two-dimensional distortion of relative-position representations between moving and flashed stimuli. The results showed that the perceived position of a flash is not uniformly displaced but shifted toward a single convergent point back along the trajectory of a moving object (K. Watanabe & K. Yokoi, 2006, 2007). In the present study, we examined the temporal dynamics of the anisotropic distortion of visual position representation. While observers fixated on a stationary cross, a black disk appeared, moved along a horizontal trajectory, and disappeared. A white dot was briefly flashed at various positions relative to the moving disk and at various timings relative to the motion onset/offset. The temporal emerging-waning pattern of anisotropic mislocalization indicated that position representation in the space ahead of a moving object differs qualitatively from that in the space behind it. Thus, anisotropic mislocalization cannot be explained by either a spatially or a temporally homogeneous process. Instead, visual position representation is anisotropically influenced by moving objects in both space and time.

Original languageEnglish
Article number13
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Mar 14
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Flash-lag
  • Motion
  • Offset
  • Onset
  • Position

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Dynamic distortion of visual position representation around moving objects. / Watanabe, Katsumi; Yokoi, Kenji.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 8, No. 3, 13, 14.03.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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