Dynamic observation of Si (111) surface using a fast scanning tunneling microscope

Sumio Hosaka, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, Shigeyuki Hosoki, Keiji Takata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Atomic structures of a Si (111) surface are dynamically observed at a 2 s/frame velocity over a scanning field about 150 Å×150 Å using a fast scanning tunneling microscope (FSTM). A FSTM has been developed and it features a compensation method for probe tip servo position error in the constant current mode. The compensation value is derived from the ratio of tunnel current fluctuation and tunnel current (Δ I/I) in differential-type tunnel current equation. The FSTM provides first dynamic observation of a residual gas molecule adsorption on atomic defects in 7×7 Si adatom reconstructions using a video tape recorder. In addition, a thermal drift of about 10 Å /s, about 30 min after direct electric flash heating of the sample for Si surface cleaning, can be easily observed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-140
Number of pages3
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

microscopes
tunnels
scanning
video tape recorders
position errors
residual gas
atomic structure
cleaning
adatoms
flash
adsorption
heating
probes
defects
molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Dynamic observation of Si (111) surface using a fast scanning tunneling microscope. / Hosaka, Sumio; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Hosoki, Shigeyuki; Takata, Keiji.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 57, No. 2, 1990, p. 138-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hosaka, Sumio ; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi ; Hosoki, Shigeyuki ; Takata, Keiji. / Dynamic observation of Si (111) surface using a fast scanning tunneling microscope. In: Applied Physics Letters. 1990 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 138-140.
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