Dynamic visual acuity in baseball players is due to superior tracking abilities

Yusuke Uchida, Daisuke Kudoh, Takatoshi Higuchi, Masaaki Honda, And Kazuyuki Kanosue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is defined as the ability to discriminate the fine parts of a moving object. DVA is generally better in baseball players than that in nonplayers. Although the better DVA of baseball players has been attributed to a better ability to track moving objects, it might be derived from the ability to perceive an object even in the presence of a great distance between the image on the retina and the fovea (retinal error). However, the ability to perceive moving visual stimuli has not been compared between baseball players and nonplayers. Methods: To clarify this, we quantitatively measured abilities of eye movement and visual perception using moving Landolt C rings in baseball players and nonplayers. Results: Baseball players could achieve high DVA with significantly faster eye movement at shorter latencies than nonplayers. There was no difference in the ability to perceive moving object's images projected onto the retina between baseball players and nonplayers. Conclusions: These results suggest that the better DVA of baseball players is primarily due to a better ability to track moving objects with their eyes rather than to improved perception of moving images on the retina. This skill is probably obtained through baseball training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-325
Number of pages7
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb

Fingerprint

Baseball
Aptitude
Visual Acuity
Retina
Eye Movements
Visual Perception

Keywords

  • DVA
  • retinal error
  • saccade
  • sports vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Dynamic visual acuity in baseball players is due to superior tracking abilities. / Uchida, Yusuke; Kudoh, Daisuke; Higuchi, Takatoshi; Honda, Masaaki; Kanosue, And Kazuyuki.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 45, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 319-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Uchida, Yusuke ; Kudoh, Daisuke ; Higuchi, Takatoshi ; Honda, Masaaki ; Kanosue, And Kazuyuki. / Dynamic visual acuity in baseball players is due to superior tracking abilities. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2013 ; Vol. 45, No. 2. pp. 319-325.
@article{1b6ced2efe6b4829b16fa9515e5661d7,
title = "Dynamic visual acuity in baseball players is due to superior tracking abilities",
abstract = "Purpose: Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is defined as the ability to discriminate the fine parts of a moving object. DVA is generally better in baseball players than that in nonplayers. Although the better DVA of baseball players has been attributed to a better ability to track moving objects, it might be derived from the ability to perceive an object even in the presence of a great distance between the image on the retina and the fovea (retinal error). However, the ability to perceive moving visual stimuli has not been compared between baseball players and nonplayers. Methods: To clarify this, we quantitatively measured abilities of eye movement and visual perception using moving Landolt C rings in baseball players and nonplayers. Results: Baseball players could achieve high DVA with significantly faster eye movement at shorter latencies than nonplayers. There was no difference in the ability to perceive moving object's images projected onto the retina between baseball players and nonplayers. Conclusions: These results suggest that the better DVA of baseball players is primarily due to a better ability to track moving objects with their eyes rather than to improved perception of moving images on the retina. This skill is probably obtained through baseball training.",
keywords = "DVA, retinal error, saccade, sports vision",
author = "Yusuke Uchida and Daisuke Kudoh and Takatoshi Higuchi and Masaaki Honda and Kanosue, {And Kazuyuki}",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1249/MSS.0b013e31826fec97",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "319--325",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dynamic visual acuity in baseball players is due to superior tracking abilities

AU - Uchida, Yusuke

AU - Kudoh, Daisuke

AU - Higuchi, Takatoshi

AU - Honda, Masaaki

AU - Kanosue, And Kazuyuki

PY - 2013/2

Y1 - 2013/2

N2 - Purpose: Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is defined as the ability to discriminate the fine parts of a moving object. DVA is generally better in baseball players than that in nonplayers. Although the better DVA of baseball players has been attributed to a better ability to track moving objects, it might be derived from the ability to perceive an object even in the presence of a great distance between the image on the retina and the fovea (retinal error). However, the ability to perceive moving visual stimuli has not been compared between baseball players and nonplayers. Methods: To clarify this, we quantitatively measured abilities of eye movement and visual perception using moving Landolt C rings in baseball players and nonplayers. Results: Baseball players could achieve high DVA with significantly faster eye movement at shorter latencies than nonplayers. There was no difference in the ability to perceive moving object's images projected onto the retina between baseball players and nonplayers. Conclusions: These results suggest that the better DVA of baseball players is primarily due to a better ability to track moving objects with their eyes rather than to improved perception of moving images on the retina. This skill is probably obtained through baseball training.

AB - Purpose: Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is defined as the ability to discriminate the fine parts of a moving object. DVA is generally better in baseball players than that in nonplayers. Although the better DVA of baseball players has been attributed to a better ability to track moving objects, it might be derived from the ability to perceive an object even in the presence of a great distance between the image on the retina and the fovea (retinal error). However, the ability to perceive moving visual stimuli has not been compared between baseball players and nonplayers. Methods: To clarify this, we quantitatively measured abilities of eye movement and visual perception using moving Landolt C rings in baseball players and nonplayers. Results: Baseball players could achieve high DVA with significantly faster eye movement at shorter latencies than nonplayers. There was no difference in the ability to perceive moving object's images projected onto the retina between baseball players and nonplayers. Conclusions: These results suggest that the better DVA of baseball players is primarily due to a better ability to track moving objects with their eyes rather than to improved perception of moving images on the retina. This skill is probably obtained through baseball training.

KW - DVA

KW - retinal error

KW - saccade

KW - sports vision

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84872870230&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84872870230&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31826fec97

DO - 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31826fec97

M3 - Article

C2 - 22935736

AN - SCOPUS:84872870230

VL - 45

SP - 319

EP - 325

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 2

ER -