Dynamics of cultural ecosystems in the Makassar mountainous region

effect of the watershed management project, south Sulawesi, Indonesia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the mountainous "Gantarang' region inhabited by the Makassar people, the upper classes living at the foot of the local palace monopolised rainfed rice fields and sugar palm communities, while the commoners, who were shifting cultivators, produced maize on the slopes of the mountains around the upper classes' villages. From the 1970s, the commoners began to settle down and make colonies on the middle mountain slopes as a result of strong prohibition of shifting cultivation due to pine plantation projects by the government. In the late 1980s, when the watershed management project was inaugurated, slash-and-burn agriculture and firing for grazing had vanished. Since the implementation of the project, the upper classes have been earning considerable amounts of cash income as wage laborers for the various activities of the project, and the commoners have been diversifying their income sources, stimulated by construction and improvement of the road network. -from English summary

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)224-244
Number of pages21
JournalSoutheast Asian Studies (Kyoto)
Volume33
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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upper class
project management
Indonesia
shifting cultivation
ecosystem
income
road network
mountain
wage
village
paddy field
agriculture
sugar
plantation
grazing
maize
community
effect
watershed management
project

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "In the mountainous {"}Gantarang' region inhabited by the Makassar people, the upper classes living at the foot of the local palace monopolised rainfed rice fields and sugar palm communities, while the commoners, who were shifting cultivators, produced maize on the slopes of the mountains around the upper classes' villages. From the 1970s, the commoners began to settle down and make colonies on the middle mountain slopes as a result of strong prohibition of shifting cultivation due to pine plantation projects by the government. In the late 1980s, when the watershed management project was inaugurated, slash-and-burn agriculture and firing for grazing had vanished. Since the implementation of the project, the upper classes have been earning considerable amounts of cash income as wage laborers for the various activities of the project, and the commoners have been diversifying their income sources, stimulated by construction and improvement of the road network. -from English summary",
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