Ecosystem development and carbon cycle on a glacier foreland in the high Arctic, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard

Takayuki Nakatsubo, Yukiko Sakata Bekku, Masaki Uchida, Hiroyuki Muraoka, Atsushi Kume, Toshiyuki Ohtsuka, Takehiro Masuzawa, Hiroshi Kanda, Hiroshi Koizumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Arctic terrestrial ecosystem is thought to be extremely susceptible to climate change. However, because of the diverse responses of ecosystem components to change, an overall response of the ecosystem carbon cycle to climate change is still hard to predict. In this review, we focus on several recent studies conducted to clarify the pattern of the carbon cycle on the deglaciated area of Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in the high Arctic. Vegetation cover and soil carbon pools tended to increase with the progress of succession. However, even in the latter stages of succession, the size of the soil carbon pool was much smaller than those reported for the low Arctic tundra. Cryptogams contributed the major proportion of phytomass in the later stages. However, because of water limitation, their net primary production was smaller than that of the vascular plants. The compartment model that incorporated major carbon pools and flows suggested that the ecosystem of the later stages is likely to be a net sink of carbon at least for the summer season. Based on the eco-physiological characteristics of the major ecosystem components, we suggest several possible scenarios of future changes in the ecosystem carbon cycle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-179
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Plant Research
Volume118
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jul
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

glaciers
Arctic region
carbon sinks
ecosystems
climate change
cryptogams
tundra
vegetation cover
vascular plants
primary productivity
soil
carbon cycle
summer
water

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Ecosystem carbon cycle
  • Glacier foreland
  • High Arctic
  • Succession
  • Svalbard

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Nakatsubo, T., Bekku, Y. S., Uchida, M., Muraoka, H., Kume, A., Ohtsuka, T., ... Koizumi, H. (2005). Ecosystem development and carbon cycle on a glacier foreland in the high Arctic, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. Journal of Plant Research, 118(3), 173-179. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10265-005-0211-9

Ecosystem development and carbon cycle on a glacier foreland in the high Arctic, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. / Nakatsubo, Takayuki; Bekku, Yukiko Sakata; Uchida, Masaki; Muraoka, Hiroyuki; Kume, Atsushi; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Masuzawa, Takehiro; Kanda, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Hiroshi.

In: Journal of Plant Research, Vol. 118, No. 3, 07.2005, p. 173-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakatsubo, T, Bekku, YS, Uchida, M, Muraoka, H, Kume, A, Ohtsuka, T, Masuzawa, T, Kanda, H & Koizumi, H 2005, 'Ecosystem development and carbon cycle on a glacier foreland in the high Arctic, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard', Journal of Plant Research, vol. 118, no. 3, pp. 173-179. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10265-005-0211-9
Nakatsubo, Takayuki ; Bekku, Yukiko Sakata ; Uchida, Masaki ; Muraoka, Hiroyuki ; Kume, Atsushi ; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki ; Masuzawa, Takehiro ; Kanda, Hiroshi ; Koizumi, Hiroshi. / Ecosystem development and carbon cycle on a glacier foreland in the high Arctic, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. In: Journal of Plant Research. 2005 ; Vol. 118, No. 3. pp. 173-179.
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