Effect of a global warming-induced increase in typhoon intensity on urban productivity in Taiwan

Miguel Esteban, Christian Webersik, Tomoya Shibayama

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A number of scientists have recently conducted research that shows that tropical cyclone intensity is likely to increase in the future due to the warming effect of greenhouse gases on surface sea temperatures. The aim of this paper is to establish what would be the likely decrease in the productivity of urban workers due to an increase in tropical cyclone-related downtime. The methodology used simulates future tropical cyclones by magnifying the intensity of historical tropical cyclones between the years 1978 and 2008. It then uses a Monte Carlo simulation to obtain the expected number of hours that a certain area can expect to be affected by winds of a given strength. It shows how annual downtime from tropical cyclones could increase from 1.5% nowadays to up to 2.2% by 2085, an increase of almost 50%. This decrease in productivity could result in a loss of up to 0.7% of the annual Taiwanese GDP by 2085.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)151-163
    Number of pages13
    JournalSustainability Science
    Volume4
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Fingerprint

    Global Warming
    Cyclonic Storms
    typhoon
    Taiwan
    tropical cyclone
    global warming
    productivity
    worker
    Greenhouse Effect
    simulation
    methodology
    Gross Domestic Product
    Oceans and Seas
    greenhouse gas
    sea surface temperature
    warming
    Gases
    effect
    Temperature
    Research

    Keywords

    • Climate change
    • Intensity increase
    • Productivity
    • Tropical cyclone
    • Typhoon
    • Urban areas

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Health(social science)
    • Geography, Planning and Development
    • Ecology
    • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
    • Nature and Landscape Conservation
    • Global and Planetary Change

    Cite this

    Effect of a global warming-induced increase in typhoon intensity on urban productivity in Taiwan. / Esteban, Miguel; Webersik, Christian; Shibayama, Tomoya.

    In: Sustainability Science, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2009, p. 151-163.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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