Effect of baseline self-efficacy on physical activity and psychological stress after a one-week pedometer intervention

Jun Tayama, Hironori Yamasaki, Mami Tamai, Masaki Hayashida, Susumu Shirabe, Kazuki Nishiura, Toyohiro Hamaguchi, Tadaaki Tomiie, Naoki Nakaya

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Abstract

Physical activity and psychological stress were hypothesized to improve more in participants with high self-efficacy than in those with low and medium self-efficacy, after a one-week intervention. 39 female university students participated. The intervention had two steps: a lecture on self-monitoring and goal setting (160 min.) and a one-week pedometer intervention. Analyses were conducted on tertile groups according to self-efficacy at baseline. Pedometer step counts were higher in the high self-efficacy group than in the low self-efficacy group after intervention. Helplessness decreased time dependently after intervention only in the high-self-efficacy group. Because physical activity improved more in the high self-efficacy group after a one-week intervention, one hypothesis was supported.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)407-418
Number of pages12
JournalPerceptual and motor skills
Volume114
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Apr 1

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Tayama, J., Yamasaki, H., Tamai, M., Hayashida, M., Shirabe, S., Nishiura, K., Hamaguchi, T., Tomiie, T., & Nakaya, N. (2012). Effect of baseline self-efficacy on physical activity and psychological stress after a one-week pedometer intervention. Perceptual and motor skills, 114(2), 407-418. https://doi.org/10.2466/24.27.PMS.114.2.407-418