Effect of hopping frequency on bilateral differences in leg stiffness

Hiroaki Hobara, Koh Inoue, Kazuyuki Kanosue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the degree of leg stiffness during human movement would provide important information that may be used for injury prevention. In the current study, we investigated bilateral differences in leg stiffness during one-legged hopping. Ten male participants performed one-legged hopping in place, matching metronome beats at 1.5, 2.2, and 3.0 Hz. Based on a spring-mass model, we calculated leg stiffness, which is defined as the ratio of maximal ground reaction force to maximum center of mass displacement at the middle of the stance phase, measured from vertical ground reaction force. In all hopping frequency settings, there was no significant difference in leg stiffness between legs. Although not statistically significant, asymmetry was the greatest at 1.5 Hz, followed by 2.2 and 3.0 Hz for all dependent variables. Furthermore, the number of subjects with an asymmetry greater than the 10% criterion was larger at 1.5 Hz than those at 2.2 and 3.0 Hz. These results will assist in the formulation of treatment-specific training regimes and rehabilitation programs for lower extremity injuries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-60
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Biomechanics
Volume29
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb

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Leg
Wounds and Injuries
Lower Extremity
Rehabilitation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Limb dominance
  • Lower extremity
  • Spring-mass model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biophysics
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effect of hopping frequency on bilateral differences in leg stiffness. / Hobara, Hiroaki; Inoue, Koh; Kanosue, Kazuyuki.

In: Journal of Applied Biomechanics, Vol. 29, No. 1, 02.2013, p. 55-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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