Effect of prolonged stress on the adrenal hormones of individuals with irritable bowel syndrome

Nagisa Sugaya, Shuhei Izawa, Keisuke Saito, Kentaro Shirotsuki, Shinobu Nomura, Hironori Shimada

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    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged stress on the salivary adrenal hormones (cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], DHEA-sulfate [DHEA-S]) of individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods: The participants were female college students, including 10 with IBS and 16 without IBS (control group), who were scheduled for a 2-week teaching practice at a kindergarten. Participants were asked to collect saliva for determining adrenal hormones immediately and 30 min after awakening and before sleep, 2 weeks before the practice, the first week of the practice, the second week of the practice, and a few days after the practice. Results: Regarding cortisol/DHEA ratio, significantly increased levels were found during the first week of the practice, and a significant interaction between group and time was found; the ratio at 30 min after awakening in the IBS group was higher than that in the control group. For the other adrenal hormone indexes, no significant differences due to the presence of IBS were found. Conclusions: Individuals with IBS showed an elevated cortisol/DHEA ratio after awakening compared with individuals without IBS, and the elevated ratio peaked under the prolonged stress. The present study suggests that the cortisol effect is dominant in individuals with IBS under prolonged stress.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number4
    JournalBioPsychoSocial Medicine
    Volume9
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 23

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    Keywords

    • Cortisol
    • Dehydroepiandrosterone
    • Irritable bowel syndrome
    • Prolonged stress
    • Saliva

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health
    • Biological Psychiatry
    • Psychology(all)
    • Social Psychology

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