Effects of an indoor thermal environment created by heating systems in Japan based on skin moisture content and thermal comfort

Yuka Sakurai, Ayaka Hirose, Kazunori Matsumae, Reo Murakami, Manami Shinohara, Shinichi Tanabe

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    Recently, there has been increasing concern about dry skin in Japan with regards to beauty and atopic dermatitis. People are likely to feel dry more frequently in a heated room in winter. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a thermal environment created by heating systems on skin moisture content and thermal comfort and to propose an effective method to maintain skin moisture content when using heating systems. In this study, subjective tests were conducted in model living rooms in a climate chamber. The tests were conducted in a total of 18 different thermal conditions. Air temperatures were controlled using a floor heating system or an air conditioner, and relative humidity conditions were set using a humidifier. During the tests, the subjects answered questionnaires regarding thermal comfort. The results suggest that the air velocity in an air-conditioned room increases with increasing air temperature, resulting in dry skin on the face. Therefore, it is reasonable to suppose that avoiding direct exposure to airflow is effective for increasing skin moisture content. The results also suggest that skin moisture content is influenced by relative humidity, absolute humidity, and air temperature.

    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1
    EventHealthy Buildings Europe 2015, HB 2015 - Eindhoven, Netherlands
    Duration: 2015 May 182015 May 20

    Other

    OtherHealthy Buildings Europe 2015, HB 2015
    CountryNetherlands
    CityEindhoven
    Period15/5/1815/5/20

    Keywords

    • Airflow Velocity
    • Heating System
    • Humidity
    • Skin Moisture Content
    • Subjective Experiment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Civil and Structural Engineering

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of an indoor thermal environment created by heating systems in Japan based on skin moisture content and thermal comfort'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Sakurai, Y., Hirose, A., Matsumae, K., Murakami, R., Shinohara, M., & Tanabe, S. (2015). Effects of an indoor thermal environment created by heating systems in Japan based on skin moisture content and thermal comfort. Paper presented at Healthy Buildings Europe 2015, HB 2015, Eindhoven, Netherlands.