Effects of hemoglobin vesicles on resting and agonist-stimulated human platelets in vitro

Shinobu Wakamoto, Mitsuhiro Fujihara, Hideki Abe, Miki Yamaguchi, Hiroshi Azuma, Hisami Ikeda, Shinji Takeoka, Eishun Tsuchida

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Hemoglobin vesicles (HbV) are artificial oxygen carriers that encapsulate a concentrated hemoglobin (Hb) solution with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The oxygen transporting ability of HbV in vivo has been demonstrated by the transfusion of HbV into hemorrhagic shock rodent models. However, the compatibility of HbV with human blood cells must be evaluated. Preincubation of platelets with concentrations of 20% or 40% HbV had no effect on the binding of PAC-1, a monoclonal antibody that detects activation-dependent conformational changes in αIIbβ3 on platelets, or the surface expression of CD62P in whole blood. ADP-induced increases in PAC-1 binding were significantly enhanced by exposing the platelets to concentrations of either 20% or 40% HbV, whereas the ADP-induced increases in CD62P expression were not affected by HbV treatment at either concentration. Preincubation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with HbV minimally reduced the spontaneous release of TXB2 and RANTES, but did not significantly affect the formation of TXB 2 or the release of RANTES and β-TG in platelets stimulated with ADP. Similarly, preincubation of PRP with HbV minimally reduced the spontaneous release of RANTES but did not significantly affect the formation of TXB 2 or the release of RANTES and β-TG in platelets stimulated with collagen, although collagen-induced serotonin release tended to decrease with HbV pretreatment. These data suggest that the exposure of human platelets to high concentrations of HbV (up to 40%) in vitro did not cause platelet activation and did not adversely affect the formation and secretion of prothrombotic substances or proinflammatory substances triggered by platelet agonists, although one of the earliest events in ADP-induced platelet activation was slightly potentiated by HbV pretreatment at the doses tested. Taken together, these results imply that HbV, at concentrations of up to 40%, do not have any aberrant interactions with either unstimulated or agonist-induced platelets.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)101-111
    Number of pages11
    JournalArtificial Cells, Blood Substitutes, and Immobilization Biotechnology
    Volume33
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    Hemoglobin
    Platelets
    Hemoglobins
    Blood Platelets
    Chemokine CCL5
    Administrative data processing
    Adenosine Diphosphate
    Platelet-Rich Plasma
    Platelet Activation
    Chemical activation
    In Vitro Techniques
    Collagen
    Blood
    Oxygen
    Blood Substitutes
    Plasmas
    Hemorrhagic Shock
    Monoclonal antibodies
    Phospholipids
    Rodentia

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biomedical Engineering
    • Hematology
    • Biotechnology
    • Biomaterials

    Cite this

    Effects of hemoglobin vesicles on resting and agonist-stimulated human platelets in vitro. / Wakamoto, Shinobu; Fujihara, Mitsuhiro; Abe, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Miki; Azuma, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Hisami; Takeoka, Shinji; Tsuchida, Eishun.

    In: Artificial Cells, Blood Substitutes, and Immobilization Biotechnology, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2005, p. 101-111.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Wakamoto, Shinobu ; Fujihara, Mitsuhiro ; Abe, Hideki ; Yamaguchi, Miki ; Azuma, Hiroshi ; Ikeda, Hisami ; Takeoka, Shinji ; Tsuchida, Eishun. / Effects of hemoglobin vesicles on resting and agonist-stimulated human platelets in vitro. In: Artificial Cells, Blood Substitutes, and Immobilization Biotechnology. 2005 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 101-111.
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    abstract = "Hemoglobin vesicles (HbV) are artificial oxygen carriers that encapsulate a concentrated hemoglobin (Hb) solution with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The oxygen transporting ability of HbV in vivo has been demonstrated by the transfusion of HbV into hemorrhagic shock rodent models. However, the compatibility of HbV with human blood cells must be evaluated. Preincubation of platelets with concentrations of 20{\%} or 40{\%} HbV had no effect on the binding of PAC-1, a monoclonal antibody that detects activation-dependent conformational changes in αIIbβ3 on platelets, or the surface expression of CD62P in whole blood. ADP-induced increases in PAC-1 binding were significantly enhanced by exposing the platelets to concentrations of either 20{\%} or 40{\%} HbV, whereas the ADP-induced increases in CD62P expression were not affected by HbV treatment at either concentration. Preincubation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with HbV minimally reduced the spontaneous release of TXB2 and RANTES, but did not significantly affect the formation of TXB 2 or the release of RANTES and β-TG in platelets stimulated with ADP. Similarly, preincubation of PRP with HbV minimally reduced the spontaneous release of RANTES but did not significantly affect the formation of TXB 2 or the release of RANTES and β-TG in platelets stimulated with collagen, although collagen-induced serotonin release tended to decrease with HbV pretreatment. These data suggest that the exposure of human platelets to high concentrations of HbV (up to 40{\%}) in vitro did not cause platelet activation and did not adversely affect the formation and secretion of prothrombotic substances or proinflammatory substances triggered by platelet agonists, although one of the earliest events in ADP-induced platelet activation was slightly potentiated by HbV pretreatment at the doses tested. Taken together, these results imply that HbV, at concentrations of up to 40{\%}, do not have any aberrant interactions with either unstimulated or agonist-induced platelets.",
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