Effects of long-term practice on coordination between different joint motions in street dancers

Akito Miura, Kazutoshi Kudo, Tatsuyuki Ohtsuki, Kimitaka Nakazawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This study investigated practice-induced change in coordination among the movement of different joints in street dancers. It did so by quantifying similarities in shape and phase lag among hip, knee, and ankle joint angles. Skilled street dancers and non-dancers were asked to synchronize a standing position knee-bending movement to a metronome beat over a wide range of beat frequencies. The similarity in the shape between the time series of the joint angle pairs was characterized by the peak value of a cross correlation function (CCF). The peak value of CCF in the hip-ankle angle pair was found to be significantly greater in dancers than in non-dancers, indicating coordination to be higher in dancers. The phase lag between hip and knee/ankle joint movements characterized by the time shift of the peak CCF value was found to be significantly greater in dancers than in nondancers. Because humans intrinsically have difficulties in developing a phase lag among joint movements, the greater extent of coordination and larger phase lag in dancers suggests that motor learning of coordination among joint movements in street dance is characterized by a stabilizing coordination pattern that involves an increase in phase lag among joint movements. This stabilizing pattern may play an important role in artistic expressions in street dance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Arts Biomechanics
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages113-124
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781536156423
ISBN (Print)9781536156416
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jul 8
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coordination dynamics
  • Cross correlation function
  • Motor control
  • Motor learning
  • Street dance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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