Effects of television luminance and wavelength at habitual bedtime on melatonin and cortisol secretion in humans

Yoko Komada, Kazuyuki Aoki, Seiichi Gohshi, Hideki Ichioka, Shigenobu Shibata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exposure to different types of television displays at habitual bedtime on human melatonin and cortisol secretion. Thirteen male participants (mean age: 22.7 ± 0.85 years) were tested over three nights in one baseline and two experimental sessions. Participants were instructed to watch a movie on four different luminance- and wavelength-controlled television displays: normal luminance (450 candela [cd]/m2) or high luminance (1200cd/m2) and normal blue light or half blue light. Salivary melatonin and cortisol levels were measured at two time points before and after television viewing. There was no significant difference in cortisol secretion due to the different displays. Melatonin suppression was significantly lower following the exposure to the half-blue light display compared with the normal blue light display. These results suggest that the use of half-blue light displays during night time may prevent circadian rhythm dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-322
Number of pages7
JournalSleep and Biological Rhythms
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

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Television
Melatonin
Hydrocortisone
Light
Motion Pictures
Circadian Rhythm

Keywords

  • Blue light
  • Circadian rhythm
  • Cortisol
  • Human
  • Melatonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Neurology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Effects of television luminance and wavelength at habitual bedtime on melatonin and cortisol secretion in humans. / Komada, Yoko; Aoki, Kazuyuki; Gohshi, Seiichi; Ichioka, Hideki; Shibata, Shigenobu.

In: Sleep and Biological Rhythms, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. 316-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Komada, Yoko ; Aoki, Kazuyuki ; Gohshi, Seiichi ; Ichioka, Hideki ; Shibata, Shigenobu. / Effects of television luminance and wavelength at habitual bedtime on melatonin and cortisol secretion in humans. In: Sleep and Biological Rhythms. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 316-322.
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