Effects of temporal judgment on source monitoring and response bias

Eriko Sugimori, Takashi Kusumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Our goal was to investigate the effects of temporal judgment on source monitoring and response bias for imagined and perceived drawings. We separated the learning sessions into two days (Day 1 and Day 2) and collected the Day 2 source of each item. The results show that among participants who viewed perceived drawings on Day 1 and imagined items on Day 2, the likelihood of attributing the test items to the perceived drawings category increased with increased repetition of the perceived items. However, when an item was perceived in the learning phase, even if items were imagined repeatedly, the "imagined" responses did not interfere with the rate of "perceived" responses. Furthermore, when an "unknown" response category was included, the response bias of "imagined" decreased, but the response bias of "perceived" did not.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-195
Number of pages11
JournalPsychologia
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Sep
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Memory
  • Meta memory
  • Response bias
  • Source monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Effects of temporal judgment on source monitoring and response bias. / Sugimori, Eriko; Kusumi, Takashi.

In: Psychologia, Vol. 51, No. 3, 09.2008, p. 185-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sugimori, Eriko ; Kusumi, Takashi. / Effects of temporal judgment on source monitoring and response bias. In: Psychologia. 2008 ; Vol. 51, No. 3. pp. 185-195.
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