Efflux of carbon dioxide from snow-covered forest floors

Shigeru Mariko, Yukiko Bekku, Hiroshi Koizumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The release of CO2 from the snow surface in winter and the soil surface in summer was directly or indirectly measured in four cool-temperate deciduous broadleaved and evergreen needle forests. The closed chamber method (CC-method) and Fick's diffusion model (DM-method) were used for the direct and indirect measurements, respectively. The winter soil temperatures from the soil surface to 10 cm depth were between 0 and 2°C. The concentration of CO2 within snowpack increased linearly with increasing snow depth. The average effluxes of CO2 calculated from the gradients of CO2 concentration in the snow using the DM-method ranged from 20 to 75 mg CO2 m-2 h-1, while the CC-method showed the average effluxes of 20 to 50 mg CO2m-2h-1. These results reveal that the snow thermally insulates the soil, allowing CO2 production to continue at soil temperatures a little above freezing throughout the winter. Carbon dioxide formed in the soil can move across snowpack up to the atmosphere. The winter/summer ratio of CO2 emission was estimated to be higher than 7%. Therefore, the snow-covered soil served as a source of CO2 in the winter and the effluxes represent an important part of the annual CO2 budget in snowy regions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-350
Number of pages8
JournalEcological Research
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994 Dec
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

forest floor
forest litter
snow
carbon dioxide
winter
snowpack
soil temperature
soil surface
soil
evergreen forest
summer
freezing
method
atmosphere
methodology

Keywords

  • closed chamber method
  • CO flux
  • CO profile
  • snowpack
  • soil respiration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Efflux of carbon dioxide from snow-covered forest floors. / Mariko, Shigeru; Bekku, Yukiko; Koizumi, Hiroshi.

In: Ecological Research, Vol. 9, No. 3, 12.1994, p. 343-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mariko, S, Bekku, Y & Koizumi, H 1994, 'Efflux of carbon dioxide from snow-covered forest floors', Ecological Research, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 343-350. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02348421
Mariko, Shigeru ; Bekku, Yukiko ; Koizumi, Hiroshi. / Efflux of carbon dioxide from snow-covered forest floors. In: Ecological Research. 1994 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 343-350.
@article{2957ee60eddd4914b2180494c0c93e46,
title = "Efflux of carbon dioxide from snow-covered forest floors",
abstract = "The release of CO2 from the snow surface in winter and the soil surface in summer was directly or indirectly measured in four cool-temperate deciduous broadleaved and evergreen needle forests. The closed chamber method (CC-method) and Fick's diffusion model (DM-method) were used for the direct and indirect measurements, respectively. The winter soil temperatures from the soil surface to 10 cm depth were between 0 and 2°C. The concentration of CO2 within snowpack increased linearly with increasing snow depth. The average effluxes of CO2 calculated from the gradients of CO2 concentration in the snow using the DM-method ranged from 20 to 75 mg CO2 m-2 h-1, while the CC-method showed the average effluxes of 20 to 50 mg CO2m-2h-1. These results reveal that the snow thermally insulates the soil, allowing CO2 production to continue at soil temperatures a little above freezing throughout the winter. Carbon dioxide formed in the soil can move across snowpack up to the atmosphere. The winter/summer ratio of CO2 emission was estimated to be higher than 7{\%}. Therefore, the snow-covered soil served as a source of CO2 in the winter and the effluxes represent an important part of the annual CO2 budget in snowy regions.",
keywords = "closed chamber method, CO flux, CO profile, snowpack, soil respiration",
author = "Shigeru Mariko and Yukiko Bekku and Hiroshi Koizumi",
year = "1994",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1007/BF02348421",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "343--350",
journal = "Ecological Research",
issn = "0912-3814",
publisher = "Springer Japan",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Efflux of carbon dioxide from snow-covered forest floors

AU - Mariko, Shigeru

AU - Bekku, Yukiko

AU - Koizumi, Hiroshi

PY - 1994/12

Y1 - 1994/12

N2 - The release of CO2 from the snow surface in winter and the soil surface in summer was directly or indirectly measured in four cool-temperate deciduous broadleaved and evergreen needle forests. The closed chamber method (CC-method) and Fick's diffusion model (DM-method) were used for the direct and indirect measurements, respectively. The winter soil temperatures from the soil surface to 10 cm depth were between 0 and 2°C. The concentration of CO2 within snowpack increased linearly with increasing snow depth. The average effluxes of CO2 calculated from the gradients of CO2 concentration in the snow using the DM-method ranged from 20 to 75 mg CO2 m-2 h-1, while the CC-method showed the average effluxes of 20 to 50 mg CO2m-2h-1. These results reveal that the snow thermally insulates the soil, allowing CO2 production to continue at soil temperatures a little above freezing throughout the winter. Carbon dioxide formed in the soil can move across snowpack up to the atmosphere. The winter/summer ratio of CO2 emission was estimated to be higher than 7%. Therefore, the snow-covered soil served as a source of CO2 in the winter and the effluxes represent an important part of the annual CO2 budget in snowy regions.

AB - The release of CO2 from the snow surface in winter and the soil surface in summer was directly or indirectly measured in four cool-temperate deciduous broadleaved and evergreen needle forests. The closed chamber method (CC-method) and Fick's diffusion model (DM-method) were used for the direct and indirect measurements, respectively. The winter soil temperatures from the soil surface to 10 cm depth were between 0 and 2°C. The concentration of CO2 within snowpack increased linearly with increasing snow depth. The average effluxes of CO2 calculated from the gradients of CO2 concentration in the snow using the DM-method ranged from 20 to 75 mg CO2 m-2 h-1, while the CC-method showed the average effluxes of 20 to 50 mg CO2m-2h-1. These results reveal that the snow thermally insulates the soil, allowing CO2 production to continue at soil temperatures a little above freezing throughout the winter. Carbon dioxide formed in the soil can move across snowpack up to the atmosphere. The winter/summer ratio of CO2 emission was estimated to be higher than 7%. Therefore, the snow-covered soil served as a source of CO2 in the winter and the effluxes represent an important part of the annual CO2 budget in snowy regions.

KW - closed chamber method

KW - CO flux

KW - CO profile

KW - snowpack

KW - soil respiration

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028164016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028164016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF02348421

DO - 10.1007/BF02348421

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0028164016

VL - 9

SP - 343

EP - 350

JO - Ecological Research

JF - Ecological Research

SN - 0912-3814

IS - 3

ER -