Electrochemical prevention of marine biofouling with a carbon-chloroprene sheet

S. Nakasono, J. G. Burgess, K. Takahashi, M. Koike, C. Murayama, S. Nakamura, Tadashi Matsunaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A carbon-chloroprene sheet (CCS) electrode was used for the electrochemical disinfection of the marine gram-negative bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus. When the electrode was incubated in seawater containing 105 cells per ml for 90 min, the amount of adsorbed cells was 4.5 X 103 cells per cm2. When a potential of 1.2 V versus a saturated calomel electrode was applied to the CCS for 20 min, 67% of adsorbed cells were killed. This disinfection was due to the direct electrochemical oxidation of cells and not to a change in pH or to the generation of toxic substances, such as chlorine. In a 1-year field experiment, marine biofouling of a CCS-coated cooling pipe caused by attachment of bacteria and invertebrates was considerably reduced by application of a potential of 1.2 V versus a saturated calomel electrode. Since this method requires low potential electrical energy, use of a CCS coating appears to be a suitable method for the clean prevention of marine biofouling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3757-3762
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume59
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chloroprene
Biofouling
biofouling
electrode
Carbon
mercurous chloride
electrodes
Electrodes
carbon
disinfection
Disinfection
cells
bacterium
Vibrio alginolyticus
toxic substance
energy use
Poisons
Chlorine
Seawater
chlorine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Nakasono, S., Burgess, J. G., Takahashi, K., Koike, M., Murayama, C., Nakamura, S., & Matsunaga, T. (1993). Electrochemical prevention of marine biofouling with a carbon-chloroprene sheet. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 59(11), 3757-3762.

Electrochemical prevention of marine biofouling with a carbon-chloroprene sheet. / Nakasono, S.; Burgess, J. G.; Takahashi, K.; Koike, M.; Murayama, C.; Nakamura, S.; Matsunaga, Tadashi.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 59, No. 11, 1993, p. 3757-3762.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakasono, S, Burgess, JG, Takahashi, K, Koike, M, Murayama, C, Nakamura, S & Matsunaga, T 1993, 'Electrochemical prevention of marine biofouling with a carbon-chloroprene sheet', Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 59, no. 11, pp. 3757-3762.
Nakasono S, Burgess JG, Takahashi K, Koike M, Murayama C, Nakamura S et al. Electrochemical prevention of marine biofouling with a carbon-chloroprene sheet. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 1993;59(11):3757-3762.
Nakasono, S. ; Burgess, J. G. ; Takahashi, K. ; Koike, M. ; Murayama, C. ; Nakamura, S. ; Matsunaga, Tadashi. / Electrochemical prevention of marine biofouling with a carbon-chloroprene sheet. In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 1993 ; Vol. 59, No. 11. pp. 3757-3762.
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