Evaluating affective feedback of the 3D agent Max in a competitive cards game

Christian Becker, Helmut Prendinger, Mitsuru Ishizuka, Ipke Wachsmuth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Within the field of Embodied Conversational Agents (ECAs), the simulation of emotions has been suggested as a means to enhance the believability of ECAs and also to effectively contribute to the goal of more intuitive human-computer interfaces. Although various emotion models have been proposed, results demonstrating the appropriateness of displaying particular emotions within ECA applications are scarce or even inconsistent. Worse, questionnaire methods often seem insufficient to evaluate the impact of emotions expressed by ECAs on users. Therefore we propose to analyze non-conscious physiological feedback (bio-signals) of users within a clearly arranged dynamic interaction scenario where various emotional reactions are likely to be evoked. In addition to its diagnostic purpose, physiological user Information is also analyzed online to trigger empathic reactions of the ECA during game play, thus increasing the level of social engagement. To evaluate the appropriateness of different types of affective and empathic feedback, we implemented a cards game called Skip-Bo, where the user plays against an expressive 3D humanoid agent called Max, which was designed at the University of Bielefeld [6] and is based on the emotion simulation system of [2]. Work performed at the University of Tokyo and NII provided a real-time system for empathic (agent) feedback that allows one to derive user emotions from skin conductance and electromyography [13]. The findings of our study indicate that within a competitive gaming scenario, the absence of negative agent emotions is conceived as stressinducing and irritating, and that the integration of empathie feedback supports the acceptance of Max as a co-equal humanoid opponent.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages466-473
Number of pages8
Volume3784 LNCS
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event1st International Conference on ffective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ACII 2005 - Beijing
Duration: 2005 Oct 222005 Oct 24

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume3784 LNCS
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other1st International Conference on ffective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ACII 2005
CityBeijing
Period05/10/2205/10/24

Fingerprint

Embodied Conversational Agents
Emotions
Game
Feedback
Physiological Feedback
Expressed Emotion
Tokyo
Computer Systems
Electromyography
Human-computer Interface
Scenarios
Emotion
Evaluate
Gaming
Conductance
Real time systems
Simulation System
Trigger
Inconsistent
Questionnaire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Becker, C., Prendinger, H., Ishizuka, M., & Wachsmuth, I. (2005). Evaluating affective feedback of the 3D agent Max in a competitive cards game. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 3784 LNCS, pp. 466-473). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3784 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/11573548_60

Evaluating affective feedback of the 3D agent Max in a competitive cards game. / Becker, Christian; Prendinger, Helmut; Ishizuka, Mitsuru; Wachsmuth, Ipke.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 3784 LNCS 2005. p. 466-473 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3784 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Becker, C, Prendinger, H, Ishizuka, M & Wachsmuth, I 2005, Evaluating affective feedback of the 3D agent Max in a competitive cards game. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 3784 LNCS, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 3784 LNCS, pp. 466-473, 1st International Conference on ffective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ACII 2005, Beijing, 05/10/22. https://doi.org/10.1007/11573548_60
Becker C, Prendinger H, Ishizuka M, Wachsmuth I. Evaluating affective feedback of the 3D agent Max in a competitive cards game. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 3784 LNCS. 2005. p. 466-473. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/11573548_60
Becker, Christian ; Prendinger, Helmut ; Ishizuka, Mitsuru ; Wachsmuth, Ipke. / Evaluating affective feedback of the 3D agent Max in a competitive cards game. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 3784 LNCS 2005. pp. 466-473 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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