Evaluation of anthropometric parameters and physical fitness in elderly Japanese

Nobuyuki Miyatake, Motohiko Miyachi, Izumi Tabata, Takeyuki Numata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives We evaluated anthropometric parameters and physical fitness in elderly Japanese. Methods A total of 2,106 elderly Japanese (749 men and 1,357 women), aged 60-79 years, were enrolled in a crosssectional investigation study. Anthropometric parameters and physical fitness, i.e., muscle strength and flexibility, were measured. Of the 2,106 subjects, 569 subjects (302 men and 267 women) were further evaluated for aerobic exercise level, using the ventilatory threshold (VT). Results Muscle strength in subjects in their 70s was significantly lower than that in subjects in their 60s in both sexes. Two hundred and twenty-nine men (30.6%) and 540 women (39.8%) were taking no medications. In men, anthropometric parameters were significantly lower and muscle strength, flexibility, and work rate at VT were significantly higher in subjects without medications than these values in subjects with medications. In women, body weight, body mass index (BMI), and abdominal circumference were significantly lower, and muscle strength was significantly higher in subjects without medications than these values in subjects with medications. Conclusion This mean value may provide a useful database for evaluating anthropometric parameters and physical fitness in elderly Japanese subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-68
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Health and Preventive Medicine
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anthropometric parameters
  • Elderly Japanese
  • Muscle strength
  • Ventilatory threshold (VT)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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