Face perception in monkeys reared with no exposure to faces

Yoichi Sugita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

227 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infant monkeys were reared with no exposure to any faces for 6-24 months. Before being allowed to see a face, the monkeys showed a preference for human and monkey faces in photographs, and they discriminated human faces as well as monkey faces. After the deprivation period, the monkeys were exposed first to either human or monkey faces for a month. Soon after, the monkeys selectively discriminated the exposed species of face and showed a marked difficulty in regaining the ability to discriminate the other nonexposed species of face. These results indicate the existence of an experience-independent ability for face processing as well as an apparent sensitive period during which a broad but flexible face prototype develops into a concrete one for efficient processing of familiar faces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)394-398
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume105
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan 8
Externally publishedYes

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Haplorhini
Aptitude
Facial Recognition

Keywords

  • Deprivation
  • Development
  • Early experience
  • Sensitive period

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Face perception in monkeys reared with no exposure to faces. / Sugita, Yoichi.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 105, No. 1, 08.01.2008, p. 394-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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