Factors affecting stress placement for English nonwords include syllabic structure, lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words

Susan G. Guion, J. J. Clark, Tetsuo Harada, Ratree P. Wayland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seventeen native English speakers participated in an investigation of language users' knowledge of English main stress patterns. First, they produced 40 two-syllable nonwords of varying syllabic structure as nouns and verbs. Second, they indicated their preference for first or second syllable stress of the same words in a perception task. Finally, they indicated words they considered to be phonologically similar to the nonwords. Analyses of variance on the production and perception data indicated that both syllabic structure and lexical class (noun or verb) had an effect on main stress assignment. In logistic regression analyses on the production and perception responses, predictions of stress placement made by (1) syllable structure, (2) lexical class, and (3) stress patterns of phonologically similar words all contributed significantly and uniquely to the prediction of main stress assignment. The results indicate that phonological theories of English word stress need to allow for multiple, competing, probabilistic factors in accounts of main stress placement including syllabic structure (most notably vowel length), lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-427
Number of pages25
JournalLanguage and Speech
Volume46
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Analysis of Variance
Language
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
logistics
regression
Lexical Stress
Stress Patterns
Nonwords
Placement
Lexical Class
language
Nouns
Verbs
Assignment
Prediction
Syllable Stress
Syllable Structure
English Speakers
Word Stress

Keywords

  • English phonology
  • Lexical class
  • Statistical learning
  • Syllable structure word stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Factors affecting stress placement for English nonwords include syllabic structure, lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words. / Guion, Susan G.; Clark, J. J.; Harada, Tetsuo; Wayland, Ratree P.

In: Language and Speech, Vol. 46, No. 4, 2003, p. 403-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{77bbafb7896b4c99b4092f68bb259f8f,
title = "Factors affecting stress placement for English nonwords include syllabic structure, lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words",
abstract = "Seventeen native English speakers participated in an investigation of language users' knowledge of English main stress patterns. First, they produced 40 two-syllable nonwords of varying syllabic structure as nouns and verbs. Second, they indicated their preference for first or second syllable stress of the same words in a perception task. Finally, they indicated words they considered to be phonologically similar to the nonwords. Analyses of variance on the production and perception data indicated that both syllabic structure and lexical class (noun or verb) had an effect on main stress assignment. In logistic regression analyses on the production and perception responses, predictions of stress placement made by (1) syllable structure, (2) lexical class, and (3) stress patterns of phonologically similar words all contributed significantly and uniquely to the prediction of main stress assignment. The results indicate that phonological theories of English word stress need to allow for multiple, competing, probabilistic factors in accounts of main stress placement including syllabic structure (most notably vowel length), lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words.",
keywords = "English phonology, Lexical class, Statistical learning, Syllable structure word stress",
author = "Guion, {Susan G.} and Clark, {J. J.} and Tetsuo Harada and Wayland, {Ratree P.}",
year = "2003",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "403--427",
journal = "Language and Speech",
issn = "0023-8309",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors affecting stress placement for English nonwords include syllabic structure, lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words

AU - Guion, Susan G.

AU - Clark, J. J.

AU - Harada, Tetsuo

AU - Wayland, Ratree P.

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Seventeen native English speakers participated in an investigation of language users' knowledge of English main stress patterns. First, they produced 40 two-syllable nonwords of varying syllabic structure as nouns and verbs. Second, they indicated their preference for first or second syllable stress of the same words in a perception task. Finally, they indicated words they considered to be phonologically similar to the nonwords. Analyses of variance on the production and perception data indicated that both syllabic structure and lexical class (noun or verb) had an effect on main stress assignment. In logistic regression analyses on the production and perception responses, predictions of stress placement made by (1) syllable structure, (2) lexical class, and (3) stress patterns of phonologically similar words all contributed significantly and uniquely to the prediction of main stress assignment. The results indicate that phonological theories of English word stress need to allow for multiple, competing, probabilistic factors in accounts of main stress placement including syllabic structure (most notably vowel length), lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words.

AB - Seventeen native English speakers participated in an investigation of language users' knowledge of English main stress patterns. First, they produced 40 two-syllable nonwords of varying syllabic structure as nouns and verbs. Second, they indicated their preference for first or second syllable stress of the same words in a perception task. Finally, they indicated words they considered to be phonologically similar to the nonwords. Analyses of variance on the production and perception data indicated that both syllabic structure and lexical class (noun or verb) had an effect on main stress assignment. In logistic regression analyses on the production and perception responses, predictions of stress placement made by (1) syllable structure, (2) lexical class, and (3) stress patterns of phonologically similar words all contributed significantly and uniquely to the prediction of main stress assignment. The results indicate that phonological theories of English word stress need to allow for multiple, competing, probabilistic factors in accounts of main stress placement including syllabic structure (most notably vowel length), lexical class, and stress patterns of phonologically similar words.

KW - English phonology

KW - Lexical class

KW - Statistical learning

KW - Syllable structure word stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2942592704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2942592704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 403

EP - 427

JO - Language and Speech

JF - Language and Speech

SN - 0023-8309

IS - 4

ER -