Feedback design in augmented musical instruments

A case study with an AR drum kit

Tetsuo Yamabe, Hiroshi Asuma, Sumire Kiyono, Tatsuo Nakajima

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this paper, we introduce the AR (augmented reality) drum kit that supports a self-training process with visual guidance and feedback. While musical instruments play requires repetitive practice, the learner often easily loses interest and gives up making effort on learning. Therefore, our system was designed to keep intrinsic motivation by offering playful features, such as a game-like user interface and a variety of tasks with different difficulty levels. Moreover, as a drum kit offers distributed interaction points (i.e., drum pads), visual guidance information needs to consider that the player's attention would be fragmented during a performance. Available cognitive resources are limited for each task in such a multitasking environment, thus the information should be simple and lightweight in order not to require explicit attention. We developed several presentation styles, such as direct projection to drum pads and ambient projection on the wall, to evaluate the usability of the system. We also report preliminary user study results to identify further design issues for the future work.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings - 1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Workshop Held During RTCSA 2011
    Pages126-129
    Number of pages4
    Volume2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    Event1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Co-located with the 17th IEEE International Conference on Embedded and Real-Time Computing Systems and Applications, RTCSA 2011 - Toyama
    Duration: 2011 Aug 282011 Aug 31

    Other

    Other1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Co-located with the 17th IEEE International Conference on Embedded and Real-Time Computing Systems and Applications, RTCSA 2011
    CityToyama
    Period11/8/2811/8/31

    Fingerprint

    Musical instruments
    Multitasking
    Augmented reality
    User interfaces
    Feedback

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Computer Science Applications
    • Computer Networks and Communications

    Cite this

    Yamabe, T., Asuma, H., Kiyono, S., & Nakajima, T. (2011). Feedback design in augmented musical instruments: A case study with an AR drum kit. In Proceedings - 1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Workshop Held During RTCSA 2011 (Vol. 2, pp. 126-129). [6029872] https://doi.org/10.1109/RTCSA.2011.27

    Feedback design in augmented musical instruments : A case study with an AR drum kit. / Yamabe, Tetsuo; Asuma, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Sumire; Nakajima, Tatsuo.

    Proceedings - 1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Workshop Held During RTCSA 2011. Vol. 2 2011. p. 126-129 6029872.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Yamabe, T, Asuma, H, Kiyono, S & Nakajima, T 2011, Feedback design in augmented musical instruments: A case study with an AR drum kit. in Proceedings - 1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Workshop Held During RTCSA 2011. vol. 2, 6029872, pp. 126-129, 1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Co-located with the 17th IEEE International Conference on Embedded and Real-Time Computing Systems and Applications, RTCSA 2011, Toyama, 11/8/28. https://doi.org/10.1109/RTCSA.2011.27
    Yamabe T, Asuma H, Kiyono S, Nakajima T. Feedback design in augmented musical instruments: A case study with an AR drum kit. In Proceedings - 1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Workshop Held During RTCSA 2011. Vol. 2. 2011. p. 126-129. 6029872 https://doi.org/10.1109/RTCSA.2011.27
    Yamabe, Tetsuo ; Asuma, Hiroshi ; Kiyono, Sumire ; Nakajima, Tatsuo. / Feedback design in augmented musical instruments : A case study with an AR drum kit. Proceedings - 1st International Workshop on Cyber-Physical Systems, Networks, and Applications, CPSNA 2011, Workshop Held During RTCSA 2011. Vol. 2 2011. pp. 126-129
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