First evidence for silica condensation within the solar protoplanetary disk

Mutsumi Komatsu, Timothy Jay Fagan, Alexander N. Krot, Kazuhide Nagashima, Michail I. Petaev, Makoto Kimura, Akira Yamaguchi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Calcium-aluminum–rich inclusions (CAIs) and amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs), a refractory component of chondritic meteorites, formed in a high-temperature region of the protoplanetary disk characterized by approximately solar chemical and oxygen isotopic (Δ17O ∼ −24) compositions, most likely near the protosun. Here we describe a16O-rich (Δ17O ∼ −22 ± 2) AOA from the carbonaceous Renazzo-type (CR) chondrite Yamato-793261 containing both (i) an ultrarefractory CAI and (II) forsterite, low-Ca pyroxene, and silica, indicating formation by gas–solid reactions over a wide temperature range from -1,800 to -1,150 K. This AOA provides direct evidence for gas–solid condensation of silica in a CAI/AOA-forming region. In a gas of solar composition, the Mg/Si ratio exceeds 1, and, therefore, silica is not predicted to condense under equilibrium conditions, suggesting that the AOA formed in a parcel of gas with fractionated Mg/Si ratio, most likely due to condensation of forsterite grains. Thermodynamic modeling suggests that silica formed by condensation of nebular gas depleted by -10× in H and He that cooled at 50 K/hour at total pressure of 10−4 bar. Condensation of silica from a hot, chemically fractionated gas could explain the origin of silica identified from infrared spectroscopy of remote protostellar disks.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)7497-7502
    Number of pages6
    JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
    Volume115
    Issue number29
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jul 17

    Fingerprint

    Silicon Dioxide
    Meteoroids
    Gases
    Calcium
    Temperature
    Thermodynamics
    Spectrum Analysis
    olivine
    Oxygen
    Pressure
    forsterite

    Keywords

    • Meteorites
    • Protoplanetary disk
    • Refractory inclusions

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General

    Cite this

    First evidence for silica condensation within the solar protoplanetary disk. / Komatsu, Mutsumi; Fagan, Timothy Jay; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Petaev, Michail I.; Kimura, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Akira.

    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 115, No. 29, 17.07.2018, p. 7497-7502.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Komatsu, Mutsumi ; Fagan, Timothy Jay ; Krot, Alexander N. ; Nagashima, Kazuhide ; Petaev, Michail I. ; Kimura, Makoto ; Yamaguchi, Akira. / First evidence for silica condensation within the solar protoplanetary disk. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2018 ; Vol. 115, No. 29. pp. 7497-7502.
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    AU - Komatsu, Mutsumi

    AU - Fagan, Timothy Jay

    AU - Krot, Alexander N.

    AU - Nagashima, Kazuhide

    AU - Petaev, Michail I.

    AU - Kimura, Makoto

    AU - Yamaguchi, Akira

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    AB - Calcium-aluminum–rich inclusions (CAIs) and amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs), a refractory component of chondritic meteorites, formed in a high-temperature region of the protoplanetary disk characterized by approximately solar chemical and oxygen isotopic (Δ17O ∼ −24) compositions, most likely near the protosun. Here we describe a16O-rich (Δ17O ∼ −22 ± 2) AOA from the carbonaceous Renazzo-type (CR) chondrite Yamato-793261 containing both (i) an ultrarefractory CAI and (II) forsterite, low-Ca pyroxene, and silica, indicating formation by gas–solid reactions over a wide temperature range from -1,800 to -1,150 K. This AOA provides direct evidence for gas–solid condensation of silica in a CAI/AOA-forming region. In a gas of solar composition, the Mg/Si ratio exceeds 1, and, therefore, silica is not predicted to condense under equilibrium conditions, suggesting that the AOA formed in a parcel of gas with fractionated Mg/Si ratio, most likely due to condensation of forsterite grains. Thermodynamic modeling suggests that silica formed by condensation of nebular gas depleted by -10× in H and He that cooled at 50 K/hour at total pressure of 10−4 bar. Condensation of silica from a hot, chemically fractionated gas could explain the origin of silica identified from infrared spectroscopy of remote protostellar disks.

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