Foot posture alteration and recovery following a full marathon run

Mako Fukano, Takayuki Inami, Kento Nakagawa, Takaya Narita, Shigeo Iso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Prolonged running results in lowering of the foot arch and a low arch is associated with subsequent chronic injuries. Foot posture alteration and recovery following a marathon run remain unknown. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate foot posture alteration following a full marathon run. The three-dimensional foot posture data of 11 collegiate runners were obtained using an optical foot scanner system before, and immediately, 1 day, 3 days, and 8 days after a full marathon. The navicular height and arch height ratio significantly decreased from before to immediately, 1 day, 3 days, and 8 days after the marathon (navicular height: before, 44.2 ± 5.0 mm; immediately after, 39.4 ± 5.5 mm; 1 day, 37.7 ± 6.2 mm; 3 days, 38.7 ± 5.5 mm; 8 days, 37.6 ± 5.7 mm; arch height ratio: before, 18.4 ± 1.9; immediately after, 16.5 ± 2.5; 1 day, 15.7 ± 2.5; 3 days, 16.2 ± 2.6; 8 days, 15.6 ± 2.2, P < 0.001, respectively). By contrast, the dorsal height significantly increased from before and immediately after to 1 day after the marathon, and then significantly decreased until 8 days after the marathon (P < 0.001). These results indicate that the recovery patterns of the dorsal and navicular heights following a marathon did not coincide; the dorsal height rose temporally at 1 day after and subsequently decreased, but the navicular height decreased throughout the 8-day period after the marathon. More than one week may be necessary for sufficient foot alignment recovery from marathon-induced changes. .

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Sport Science
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jan 1

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Posture
Foot
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • anthropometry
  • deformation
  • Foot
  • marathon running

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Foot posture alteration and recovery following a full marathon run. / Fukano, Mako; Inami, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Kento; Narita, Takaya; Iso, Shigeo.

In: European Journal of Sport Science, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fukano, Mako ; Inami, Takayuki ; Nakagawa, Kento ; Narita, Takaya ; Iso, Shigeo. / Foot posture alteration and recovery following a full marathon run. In: European Journal of Sport Science. 2018.
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