Free-Standing, Nanopatterned Janus Membranes of Conducting Polymer-Virus Nanoparticle Arrays

Brylee David B. Tiu, Sicily B. Tiu, Amy M. Wen, Patricia Lam, Nicole F. Steinmetz, Rigoberto C. Advincula

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanostructured mesoscale materials find wide-ranging applications in medicine and energy. Top-down manufacturing schemes are limited by the smallest dimension accessible; therefore, we set out to study a bottom-up approach mimicking biological systems, which self-assemble into systems that orchestrate complex energy conversion functionalities. Inspired by nature, we turned toward protein-based nanoparticle structures formed by plant viruses, specifically the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). We report the formation of hierarchical CPMV nanoparticle assemblies on colloidal-patterned, conducting polymer arrays using a protocol combining colloidal lithography, electrochemical polymerization, and electrostatic adsorption. In this approach, a hexagonally close-packed array of polystyrene microspheres was assembled on a conductive electrode to function as the sacrificial colloidal template. A thin layer of conducting polypyrrole material was electrodeposited within the interstices of the colloidal microspheres and monitored in situ using electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (EC-QCM-D). Etching the template revealed an inverse opaline conducting polymer pattern capable of forming strong electrostatic interactions with CPMV and therefore enabling immobilization of CPMV on the surface. The CPMV-polymer films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore, molecular probe diffusion experiments revealed selective ion transport properties as a function of the presence of the CPMV nanoparticles on the surface. Lastly, by utilizing its electromechanical behavior, the polymer/protein membrane was electrochemically released as a free-standing film, which can potentially be used for developing high surface area cargo delivery systems, stimuli-responsive plasmonic devices, and chemical and biological sensors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6185-6193
Number of pages9
JournalLangmuir
Volume32
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 21
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Janus
Conducting polymers
conducting polymers
viruses
Viruses
Nanoparticles
membranes
Membranes
nanoparticles
Microspheres
templates
electrostatics
proteins
Proteins
Molecular Probes
interstices
cargo
Electropolymerization
Quartz crystal microbalances
Polystyrenes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Tiu, B. D. B., Tiu, S. B., Wen, A. M., Lam, P., Steinmetz, N. F., & Advincula, R. C. (2016). Free-Standing, Nanopatterned Janus Membranes of Conducting Polymer-Virus Nanoparticle Arrays. Langmuir, 32(24), 6185-6193. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b00808

Free-Standing, Nanopatterned Janus Membranes of Conducting Polymer-Virus Nanoparticle Arrays. / Tiu, Brylee David B.; Tiu, Sicily B.; Wen, Amy M.; Lam, Patricia; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Advincula, Rigoberto C.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 32, No. 24, 21.06.2016, p. 6185-6193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tiu, BDB, Tiu, SB, Wen, AM, Lam, P, Steinmetz, NF & Advincula, RC 2016, 'Free-Standing, Nanopatterned Janus Membranes of Conducting Polymer-Virus Nanoparticle Arrays', Langmuir, vol. 32, no. 24, pp. 6185-6193. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b00808
Tiu, Brylee David B. ; Tiu, Sicily B. ; Wen, Amy M. ; Lam, Patricia ; Steinmetz, Nicole F. ; Advincula, Rigoberto C. / Free-Standing, Nanopatterned Janus Membranes of Conducting Polymer-Virus Nanoparticle Arrays. In: Langmuir. 2016 ; Vol. 32, No. 24. pp. 6185-6193.
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