Free trade agreements and domestic politics: The Case of the trans-pacific partnership agreement

Megumi Naoi, Shujiro Urata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

What is the role of domestic politics in facilitating or constraining a government's decision to participate in free trade agreements (FTAs)? This paper seeks to answer this question by focusing on the domestic politics in Japan over the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). In particular, we ask why the opposition to the TPP encompasses a much broader segment of society than is predicted by trade theorems. We show that a broader protectionist coalition can emerge through persuasion and policy campaigns by the elites, in particular, powerful protectionist interests expending resources to persuade the uncertain public.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)326-349
Number of pages24
JournalAsian Economic Policy Review
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Dec

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national politics
free trade
politics
persuasion
coalition
opposition
elite
campaign
Japan
resource
resources
Free trade agreements
Domestic politics
Society
public
decision
policy
society
Resources
Persuasion

Keywords

  • Domestic politics
  • Free trade agreement
  • Japan
  • Public opinions
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Free trade agreements and domestic politics : The Case of the trans-pacific partnership agreement. / Naoi, Megumi; Urata, Shujiro.

In: Asian Economic Policy Review, Vol. 8, No. 2, 12.2013, p. 326-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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