Future climate change, the agricultural water cycle, and agricultural production in China

Fulu Tao, Masayuki Yokosawa, Yousay Hayashi, Erda Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

117 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Climate change would have a major impact on the hydrological cycle and consequently on available water resources, the potential for flood and drought, and agricultural productivity. In this study, the impacts of climate change on the agricultural water cycle and their implications for agricultural production in the 2020s were assessed by water-balance calculations for Chinese croplands. Temporal and spatial changes in potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, soil-moisture, soil-moisture deficit, yield index, and cropland surface runoff under the baseline climate and a HADCM2 general circulation model (GCM) climate-change scenario were mapped on a grid of 0.5° latitude/longitude resolution. According to the analysis, agricultural water demand in south China is projected to decrease generally, and the cropland soil-moisture deficit would decrease due to climate change. However, in north China, agricultural water demand is expected to increase, and the soil-moisture deficit would increase generally. The changes in the water resources would have consequent impacts on the yield index. Cropland surface runoff during the growing period is expected to increase on some sloping croplands in the southwest mountain areas and in some areas along the south coast. These changes would have important implications for agricultural production. Particularly the rain-fed crops in the north China plain and northeast China would face water-related challenges in coming decades due to the expected increases in water demands and soil-moisture deficit, and decreases in precipitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-215
Number of pages13
JournalAgriculture, Ecosystems and Environment
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Apr
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

hydrologic cycle
agricultural production
soil moisture
soil water
climate change
agriculture
water demand
China
water resources
evapotranspiration
runoff
water
water resource
General Circulation Models
potential evapotranspiration
hydrological cycle
longitude
water balance
general circulation model
water budget

Keywords

  • Agricultural water cycle
  • China
  • Climate change
  • Water-balance model
  • Yield index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Future climate change, the agricultural water cycle, and agricultural production in China. / Tao, Fulu; Yokosawa, Masayuki; Hayashi, Yousay; Lin, Erda.

In: Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, Vol. 95, No. 1, 04.2003, p. 203-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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