Gaze-Cueing With Crossed Eyes

Asymmetry Between Nasal and Temporal Shifts

Saki Takao, Aiko Murata, Katsumi Watanabe

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A person’s direction of gaze (and visual attention) can be inferred from the direction of the parallel shift of the eyes. However, the direction of gaze is ambiguous when there is a misalignment between the eyes. The use of schematic drawings of faces in a previous study demonstrated that gaze-cueing was equally effective, even when one eye looked straight and the other eye was averted. In the current study, we used more realistic computer-generated face models to re-examine if the diverging direction of the eyes affected gaze-cueing. The condition where one eye was averted nasally while the other looked straight produced a significantly smaller gaze-cueing effect in comparison with when both eyes were averted in parallel or one eye was averted temporally. The difference in the gaze-cueing effect disappeared when the position of one eye was occluded with a rectangular surface or an eye-patch. These results highlight the possibility that the gaze-cueing effect might be weakened when a direct gaze exists between the cueing eye (i.e., nasally oriented eye) and the target and the effect magnitude might depend on which type of face stimulus are used as a cue.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)158-170
    Number of pages13
    JournalPerception
    Volume47
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018 Feb 1

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    Keywords

    • computer-generated face model
    • crossed eyes
    • gaze-cueing
    • nasal
    • temporal

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
    • Sensory Systems
    • Artificial Intelligence

    Cite this

    Gaze-Cueing With Crossed Eyes : Asymmetry Between Nasal and Temporal Shifts. / Takao, Saki; Murata, Aiko; Watanabe, Katsumi.

    In: Perception, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 158-170.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Takao, Saki ; Murata, Aiko ; Watanabe, Katsumi. / Gaze-Cueing With Crossed Eyes : Asymmetry Between Nasal and Temporal Shifts. In: Perception. 2018 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 158-170.
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