Gestural Hesitation Reveals Children's Competence on Multimodal Communication: Emergence of Disguised Adaptor

Kazuki Sekine*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Speakers sometimes modify their gestures during the process of production into adaptors such as hair touching or eye scratching. Such disguised adaptors are evidence that the speaker can monitor their gestures. In this study, we investigated when and how disguised adaptors are first produced by children. Sixty elementary school children participated in this study. There were ten from each school year (from 7 to 12 years of age). They were instructed to remember a cartoon and retell its story to their parents. The results showed that children did not produce disguised adaptors until the age of 8. The disguised adaptors accompany fluent speech until the children are 10 years old and accompany dysfluent speech until they reach 11 or 12 years of age. These results suggest that children start to monitor their gestures when they are 9 or 10 years old. Cultural influences and cognitive changes were considered as factors to influence emergence of disguised adaptors.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCogSci 2017 - Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Subtitle of host publicationComputational Foundations of Cognition
PublisherThe Cognitive Science Society
Pages3113-3118
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9780991196760
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Computational Foundations of Cognition, CogSci 2017 - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 2017 Jul 262017 Jul 29

Publication series

NameCogSci 2017 - Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Computational Foundations of Cognition

Conference

Conference39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Computational Foundations of Cognition, CogSci 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period17/7/2617/7/29

Keywords

  • co-speech gestures
  • disguised adaptors
  • elementary school children
  • speech dysfluency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Gestural Hesitation Reveals Children's Competence on Multimodal Communication: Emergence of Disguised Adaptor'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this