High salt diet impacts the risk of sarcopenia associated with reduction of skeletal muscle performance in the Japanese population

Yasuko Yoshida*, Keisei Kosaki, Takehito Sugasawa, Masahiro Matsui, Masaki Yoshioka, Kai Aoki, Tomoaki Kuji, Risuke Mizuno, Makoto Kuro-O, Kunihiro Yamagata, Seiji Maeda, Kazuhiro Takekoshi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The World Health Organization has recommended 5 g/day as dietary reference intakes for salt. In Japan, the averages for men and women were 11.0 g/day and 9.3 g/day, respectively. Recently, it was reported that amounts of sodium accumulation in skeletal muscles of older people were significantly higher than those in younger people. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the risk of sarcopenia with decreased muscle mass and strength was related to the amount of salt intake. In addition, we investigated its involvement with renalase. Four groups based on age and salt intake (“younger low-salt,” “younger high-salt,” “older low-salt,” and “older high-salt”) were compared. Stratifying by age category, body fat percentage significantly increased in high-salt groups in both younger and older people. Handgrip strength/body weight and chair rise tests of the older high-salt group showed significant reduction compared to the older low-salt group. However, there was no significant difference in renalase concentrations in plasma. The results suggest that high-salt intake may lead to fat accumulation and muscle weakness associated with sarcopenia. Therefore, efforts to reduce salt intake may prevent sarcopenia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3474
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Nov
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Body fat percentage
  • Chair rise test
  • Knee extensor muscle strength
  • Long seat type body anteflexion
  • Maximum gait speed
  • Renalase
  • Salt
  • Sarcopenia
  • Single-leg stance time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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