High-temperature dielectric materials from atomically-thin perovskites

Minoru Osada, Takayoshi Sasaki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The search of new electronic materials for high-temperature applications has been a significant challenge in recent years. In automotive industries, for example, cutting-edge technology requires electronic components operable at high temperatures (> 200 °C). The absence of suitable capacitors is one of the major barriers to meet this goal. Here we provide a solution to these issues by using an atomically-thin perovskite nanosheet (Ca2Nb3O10), a twodimensional material derived from the exfoliation of a layered compound. Through in-situ characterizations, we found a robust thermal stability of Ca2Nb3O10) nanosheet even in a monolayer form (~ 2 nm). Furthermore, layer-bylayer assembled nanocapacitors retained both size-free high-ϵr characteristic and high insulation resistance at high temperatures up to 250 °C. The simultaneous improvement of ϵr and thermal stability in high-k nanodielectrics is of critical technological importance for the use of high-temperature capacitors.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIMAPS/ACerS 12th International Conference and Exhibition on Ceramic Interconnect and Ceramic Microsystems Technologies, CICMT 2016
PublisherIMAPS-International Microelectronics and Packaging Society
Pages164-168
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes
EventIMAPS/ACerS 12th International Conference and Exhibition on Ceramic Interconnect and Ceramic Microsystems Technologies, CICMT 2016 - Denver, United States
Duration: 2016 Apr 192016 Apr 21

Other

OtherIMAPS/ACerS 12th International Conference and Exhibition on Ceramic Interconnect and Ceramic Microsystems Technologies, CICMT 2016
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period16/4/1916/4/21

Keywords

  • High-temperature capacitors
  • Nanodielectrics
  • Oxide nanosheet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Chemistry
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Ceramics and Composites

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