Higher plasma homocysteine concentration is associated with more advanced systematic arterial stiffness and greater blood pressure response to stress in hypertensive patients

Jun Tayama, Masanori Munakata, Kaoru Yoshinaga, Takayoshi Toyota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyperhomocysteinemia has been reported to be associated with both vascular structure alteration and increased cardiovascular risk. This study examined whether hyperhomocysteinemia causes increased systemic arterial stiffness, thereby enhancing blood pressure response to stress in hypertensive patients. In 50 treated hypertensive patients, we studied brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV), a new measure for arterial stiffness, blood pressure response to stress, and blood pressure recovery after stress. Autonomic nervous activities were examined by spectral analysis of blood pressure and RR interval variabilities. Total plasma homocysteine and neurohumoral parameters were determined from fasting blood. Brachial-ankle PWV correlated with age (r=0.64, p<0.001), plasma homocysteine concentration (r=0.35, p<0.05), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (r=0.62, p<0.001). Higher plasma homocysteine concentration was independently associated with greater brachial-ankle PWV (β=0.388, p=0.01). We classified the subjects into high homocysteine (7.3 nmol/ml or over) and low homocysteine (7.2 nmol/ml or below) groups. Baseline SBP, plasma renin activity, aldosterone, and norepinephrine concentrations were similar between the two groups. However, the SBP values during stress and the recovery periods were higher in the high homocysteine group than the low homocysteine group even after adjusting for sex and age. The behavior of sympathetic vasomotor activity did not differ between the two groups. These data suggest that higher plasma homocysteine concentration is associated with increased systemic arterial stiffness, which may enhance blood pressure reactivity to stress in hypertensive patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-409
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension Research
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Jun 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vascular Stiffness
Homocysteine
Blood Pressure
Pulse Wave Analysis
Ankle
Hyperhomocysteinemia
Arm
Aldosterone
Renin
Blood Vessels
Fasting
Norepinephrine
Arterial Pressure

Keywords

  • Arterial stiffness
  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Blood pressure
  • Homocysteine
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Higher plasma homocysteine concentration is associated with more advanced systematic arterial stiffness and greater blood pressure response to stress in hypertensive patients. / Tayama, Jun; Munakata, Masanori; Yoshinaga, Kaoru; Toyota, Takayoshi.

In: Hypertension Research, Vol. 29, No. 6, 01.06.2006, p. 403-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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