Higher sleep reactivity and insomnia mutually aggravate depressive symptoms: a cross-sectional epidemiological study in Japan

Shun Nakajima, Yoko Komada, Taeko Sasai-Sakuma, Isa Okajima, Yutaka Harada, Kazue Watanabe, Yuichi Inoue

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Objective Sleep reactivity assessed using the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST) is associated with depression. This study clarified stress reactivity and insomnia effects on depressive symptoms. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to 2645 participating government employees (35.4% female, mean age 42.8 years) during health checks conducted at Tottori prefecture, Japan, in June 2012. Questionnaire items included: demographic information; the FIRST; the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); and a 12-item version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D). The study defined CES-D scores of ≥12 points as positive for depression, PSQI scores of ≥5.5 points as positive for insomnia symptoms, and FIRST scores of ≥19 points as indicating higher sleep reactivity. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed insomnia (adjusted OR = 3.40), higher sleep reactivity (adjusted OR = 1.78), presence of disease currently being treated (adjusted OR = 1.84), and being female (adjusted OR = 1.53) as independently associated with depression. Participants with insomnia and a high FIRST score showed higher CES-D scores than those with insomnia alone and those with high FIRST without insomnia (all p < 0.01). Conclusions Sleep reactivity might be associated with depression, independent of insomnia. Elevated sleep reactivity and insomnia symptoms are thought to aggravate depressive symptoms.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)130-133
    Number of pages4
    JournalSleep Medicine
    Volume33
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017 May 1

    Fingerprint

    Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
    Epidemiologic Studies
    Japan
    Sleep
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Depression
    Exercise Test
    Logistic Models
    Regression Analysis
    Demography

    Keywords

    • Comorbidity
    • Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST)
    • Mood disorder
    • Transdiagnostic
    • Vulnerability

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Higher sleep reactivity and insomnia mutually aggravate depressive symptoms : a cross-sectional epidemiological study in Japan. / Nakajima, Shun; Komada, Yoko; Sasai-Sakuma, Taeko; Okajima, Isa; Harada, Yutaka; Watanabe, Kazue; Inoue, Yuichi.

    In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 33, 01.05.2017, p. 130-133.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Nakajima, Shun ; Komada, Yoko ; Sasai-Sakuma, Taeko ; Okajima, Isa ; Harada, Yutaka ; Watanabe, Kazue ; Inoue, Yuichi. / Higher sleep reactivity and insomnia mutually aggravate depressive symptoms : a cross-sectional epidemiological study in Japan. In: Sleep Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 33. pp. 130-133.
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