Homologous recognition by RecA protein using non-equivalent three DNA-strand-binding sites

Hitoshi Kurumizaka, Takehiko Shibata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A key step in homologous recombination is the formation of a heteroduplex joint between double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA by the homologous pairing and strand-exchange, and this step is also important in recombinational repair of damaged DNA in various organisms. The homologous pairing and the strand-exchange are promoted in vivo and in vitro by RecA protein of Escherichia coli or its homologues of bacteria, virus, and lower and higher eukaryotes. A central question on the mechanism of homologous recombination is how RecA protein (and its homologues) recognizes homologous sequences between single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. Recent studies suggest that RecA protein promotes homologous recognition between these DNA molecules by the formation of a transient and additional pairing of identical sequences via non-Watson-Crick interactions to the Watson-Crick-type duplex DNA, and that RecA protein uses three non-equivalent DNA-strand-binding sites in this reaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-223
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biochemistry
Volume119
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1996 Feb
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rec A Recombinases
Binding Sites
DNA
Single-Stranded DNA
Homologous Recombination
Recombinational DNA Repair
Sequence Homology
Eukaryota
Viruses
Escherichia coli
Joints
Bacteria
Repair
Molecules

Keywords

  • Genetic recombination
  • Homologous pairing
  • Non-Watson-Crick interactions
  • Reca protein
  • Triplex DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Homologous recognition by RecA protein using non-equivalent three DNA-strand-binding sites. / Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Shibata, Takehiko.

In: Journal of Biochemistry, Vol. 119, No. 2, 02.1996, p. 216-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurumizaka, Hitoshi ; Shibata, Takehiko. / Homologous recognition by RecA protein using non-equivalent three DNA-strand-binding sites. In: Journal of Biochemistry. 1996 ; Vol. 119, No. 2. pp. 216-223.
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