How are internal models of unstable tasks formed?

E. Burdet, D. W. Franklin, Rieko Osu, K. P. Tee, M. Kawato, T. E. Milner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The results of recent studies suggest that humans can form internal models that they use in a feedforward manner to compensate for both stable and unstable dynamics. To examine how internal models are formed, we performed adaptation experiments in novel dynamics, and measured the endpoint force, trajectory and EMG during learning. Analysis of reflex feedback and change of feedforward commands between consecutive trials suggested a unified model of motor learning, which can coherently unify the learning processes observed in stable and unstable dynamics and reproduce available data on motor learning. To our knowledge, this algorithm, based on the concurrent minimization of (reflex) feedback and muscle activation, is also the first nonlinear adaptive controller able to stabilize unstable dynamics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4491-4494
Number of pages4
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume26 VI
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Learning
Reflex
Feedback
Muscle
Chemical activation
Trajectories
Muscles
Controllers
Experiments

Keywords

  • Internal models
  • Motor learning
  • Nonlinear adaptive control
  • Unstable dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

How are internal models of unstable tasks formed? / Burdet, E.; Franklin, D. W.; Osu, Rieko; Tee, K. P.; Kawato, M.; Milner, T. E.

In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings, Vol. 26 VI, 2004, p. 4491-4494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burdet, E. ; Franklin, D. W. ; Osu, Rieko ; Tee, K. P. ; Kawato, M. ; Milner, T. E. / How are internal models of unstable tasks formed?. In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. 2004 ; Vol. 26 VI. pp. 4491-4494.
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