How Do Japanese Elderly People Access Legal Services? An Analysis of Advice-Seeking Behaviour

Aya Yamaguchi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

In Japan, an increasing number of elderly people are facing legal issues. However, whether they have enough access to legal services remains unclear. Therefore, this study used a mixed-methods approach-web and interview surveys-to identify elderly people's experience with legal problems, factors that affect their decisions to consult lawyers about their problems, and factors that relate to their knowledge about the availability of legal consultation. Results showed that legal problems were related to issues with family or relatives. Second, elderly people did not consult lawyers if they could solve problems on their own, felt helpless, or lacked a connection with legal professionals. Third, respondents who had knowledge about the availability of legal consultation were male or working elderly. The overall results suggest that elderly people are not homogeneous, and more support is needed for those who feel helpless or lack knowledge about legal consultation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-305
Number of pages25
JournalAsian Journal of Law and Society
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • elderly people
  • Japan
  • legal access
  • legal services
  • mixed-methods approach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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