How does early childcare enrollment affect children, parents, and their interactions?

Shintaro Yamaguchi, Yukiko Asai, Ryo Kambayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We estimate the effects of childcare enrollment on child outcomes by exploiting a staggered childcare expansion across regions in Japan. We find that childcare improves language development and reduces the symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and aggression among the children of low-education mothers. To shed light on underlying mechanisms, we also examined parental outcomes. Estimates indicate that childcare use improves parenting quality and subjective well-being and reduces stress among low-education mothers. Our estimates for marginal treatment effects indicate that children who would benefit most from childcare are less likely to attend, implying inefficient allocation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-71
Number of pages16
JournalLabour Economics
Volume55
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Child care
Interaction
Enrollment
Education
Subjective well-being
Language
Treatment effects
Aggression
Japan
Parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

How does early childcare enrollment affect children, parents, and their interactions? / Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Asai, Yukiko; Kambayashi, Ryo.

In: Labour Economics, Vol. 55, 01.12.2018, p. 56-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamaguchi, Shintaro ; Asai, Yukiko ; Kambayashi, Ryo. / How does early childcare enrollment affect children, parents, and their interactions?. In: Labour Economics. 2018 ; Vol. 55. pp. 56-71.
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