Impact of corporate social responsibility intensity on firm-specific risk and innovation: evidence from Japan

Megumi Suto, Hitoshi Takehara*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate investors’ perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its risk-mitigating effects on firm-level innovation in Japan from 2006 to 2017. The authors examine the influence of CSR intensity on firm-specific risks, focusing on the risk-moderating effect of CSR on innovation. Design/methodology/approach: The authors conducted a simple slope analysis and panel data regressions with input and output innovation measures and idiosyncratic risk based on an asset-pricing model. Findings: The results demonstrate that CSR intensity not only reduces firm-specific risk directly but also indirectly by negatively moderating the relationship between firm-level innovation and idiosyncratic risk. Research limitations/implications: Signaling trust to capital markets, CSR engagements in the manufacturing industry are clearly important for innovative firms with active research and development undertakings. Practical implications: Corporate managers should further expand their efforts to make non-financial disclosures available, considering the interactions between CSR intensity and research and development financial risk. Originality/value: In the context of Japanese firms, this study demonstrates the interaction between CSR practices and innovation activities from the perspective of long-term management of corporate sustainability.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSocial Responsibility Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Corporate innovation
  • Corporate social responsibility
  • Corporate sustainability
  • Idiosyncratic risk
  • Investor trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of corporate social responsibility intensity on firm-specific risk and innovation: evidence from Japan'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this