Impact of intensive high-fat ingestion in the early stage of recovery from exercise training on substrate metabolism during exercise in humans

Takashi Ichinose, Natsuko Arai, Tomoaki Nagasaka, Masaya Asano, Kenji Hashimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Not only increasing body carbohydrate (CHO) stores before exercise but also suppressing CHO oxidation during exercise is important for improving endurance performance. We tested the hypothesis that intensive high-fat ingestion in the early stage of recovery from exercise training (ET) for 2 d would suppress CHO oxidation during exercise by increasing whole body lipolysis and/or fat oxidation. In a randomized crossover design, on days 1 and 2, six male subjects performed cycle ET at 50% peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) for 60-90 min, and consumed a control diet (CON: 1,224 kcal, 55% carbohydrate, 30% fat) or the same diet supplemented with high fat (HF: 1,974 kcal, 34% carbohydrate, 56% fat) 1 h after ET, with the diet other than post-ET similar in both trials. On day 3, subjects performed cycle exercise at 65% VO2 peak until exhaustion. Exercise time to exhaustion was longer in the HF trial than in the CON trial (CON: 48.9±6.7 vs. HF: 55.8±7.7 min, p<0.05). In the HF trial, total fat oxidation until exhaustion was higher, accompanied by higher post-exercise plasma glycerol concentration, than in the CON trial (CON: 213±54 vs. HF: 286±63 kcal, p<0.05), whereas total carbohydrate oxidation until exhaustion was not different between trials. These results suggest that intensive high-fat ingestion in the early stage of recovery from ET for a few days until the day before exercise was an effective means of eliciting a CHO-sparing effect during exercise by enhancing fat metabolism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-359
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Dec 1

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Keywords

  • Exercise
  • High fat
  • Lipolysis
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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