In vivo cardiac nano-imaging: A new technology for high-precision analyses of sarcomere dynamics in the heart

Togo Shimozawa, Erisa Hirokawa, Fuyu Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Kotaro Oyama, Seine A. Shintani, Takako Terui, Yasuharu Kushida, Seiichi Tsukamoto, Teruyuki Fujii, Shin'ichi Ishiwata, Norio Fukuda

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The cardiac pump function is a result of a rise in intracellular Ca2+ and the ensuing sarcomeric contractions [i.e., excitation-contraction (EC) coupling] in myocytes in various locations of the heart. In order to elucidate the heart's mechanical properties under various settings, cardiac imaging is widely performed in today's clinical as well as experimental cardiology by using echocardiogram, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. However, because these common techniques detect local myocardial movements at a spatial resolution of ∼100 μm, our knowledge on the sub-cellular mechanisms of the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart in vivo is limited. This is because (1) EC coupling occurs in the μm partition in a myocyte and (2) cardiac sarcomeres generate active force upon a length change of ∼100 nm on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent advances in optical technologies have enabled measurements of intracellular Ca2+ dynamics and sarcomere length displacements at high spatial and temporal resolution in the beating heart of living rodents. Future studies with these technologies are warranted to open a new era in cardiac research.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalProgress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology
    DOIs
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016 Jun 24

    Fingerprint

    Sarcomeres
    Excitation Contraction Coupling
    Technology
    Cardiology
    Cardiac Myocytes
    Muscle Cells
    Rodentia
    Tomography
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Research

    Keywords

    • Contractility
    • Muscle
    • Ventricular function

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biophysics
    • Molecular Biology

    Cite this

    Shimozawa, T., Hirokawa, E., Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, F., Oyama, K., Shintani, S. A., Terui, T., ... Fukuda, N. (Accepted/In press). In vivo cardiac nano-imaging: A new technology for high-precision analyses of sarcomere dynamics in the heart. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2016.09.006

    In vivo cardiac nano-imaging : A new technology for high-precision analyses of sarcomere dynamics in the heart. / Shimozawa, Togo; Hirokawa, Erisa; Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Fuyu; Oyama, Kotaro; Shintani, Seine A.; Terui, Takako; Kushida, Yasuharu; Tsukamoto, Seiichi; Fujii, Teruyuki; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Norio.

    In: Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology, 24.06.2016.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Shimozawa, T, Hirokawa, E, Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, F, Oyama, K, Shintani, SA, Terui, T, Kushida, Y, Tsukamoto, S, Fujii, T, Ishiwata, S & Fukuda, N 2016, 'In vivo cardiac nano-imaging: A new technology for high-precision analyses of sarcomere dynamics in the heart', Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2016.09.006
    Shimozawa, Togo ; Hirokawa, Erisa ; Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Fuyu ; Oyama, Kotaro ; Shintani, Seine A. ; Terui, Takako ; Kushida, Yasuharu ; Tsukamoto, Seiichi ; Fujii, Teruyuki ; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi ; Fukuda, Norio. / In vivo cardiac nano-imaging : A new technology for high-precision analyses of sarcomere dynamics in the heart. In: Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology. 2016.
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