Increase in Port Downtime and Damage in Vietnam Due To a Potential Increase in Tropical Cyclone Intensity

Miguel Esteban, Nguyen Danh Thao, Hiroshi Takagi, Tomoya Shibayama

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is currently feared that the increase in surface sea temperature resulting from increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere could result in an increase in tropical cyclone intensity in the future. Although the economic consequences have been studied for a number of developed countries, very little work has been done on developing countries. The present paper attempts to indicate what are the likely economic effects of this, by using a Monte Carlo simulation that magnifies the intensity of historical tropical cyclones between the years 1978 and 2008. This tropical cyclone model is then coupled with a socioeconomic model that attempts to provide a projection of the likely development course of the Vietnamese economy and society. The simulation shows how annual downtime from tropical cyclones could increase from 0.23 to 0.37% by 2085 which could cause the loss of between 0.015 and 0.035% of GDP growth per year (between 600 bn and 1,400 m USD after factoring in the likely growth in the Vietnamese economy by this time). The effect that this could have on port operations and a preliminary assessment on the potential for increases in direct damage due to high winds are also made, showing a typical 33 to 65% increase for the centre and north of the country.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationClimate Change Management
PublisherSpringer
Pages101-125
Number of pages25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1

Publication series

NameClimate Change Management
ISSN (Print)1610-2002
ISSN (Electronic)1610-2010

Fingerprint

tropical cyclone
damage
port operation
economics
Gross Domestic Product
simulation
greenhouse gas
sea surface temperature
developing world
atmosphere
effect
economy

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Direct damage
  • Indirect damage
  • Intensity increase
  • Port location
  • Productivity
  • Tropical cyclone
  • Typhoon
  • Vietnam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Ecology

Cite this

Esteban, M., Thao, N. D., Takagi, H., & Shibayama, T. (2012). Increase in Port Downtime and Damage in Vietnam Due To a Potential Increase in Tropical Cyclone Intensity. In Climate Change Management (pp. 101-125). (Climate Change Management). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-22266-5_7

Increase in Port Downtime and Damage in Vietnam Due To a Potential Increase in Tropical Cyclone Intensity. / Esteban, Miguel; Thao, Nguyen Danh; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Tomoya.

Climate Change Management. Springer, 2012. p. 101-125 (Climate Change Management).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Esteban, Miguel ; Thao, Nguyen Danh ; Takagi, Hiroshi ; Shibayama, Tomoya. / Increase in Port Downtime and Damage in Vietnam Due To a Potential Increase in Tropical Cyclone Intensity. Climate Change Management. Springer, 2012. pp. 101-125 (Climate Change Management).
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