Individual differences in autistic traits predict the perception of direct gaze for males, but not for females

Daisuke Matsuyoshi, Kana Kuraguchi, Yumiko Tanaka, Seina Uchida, Hiroshi Ashida, Katsumi Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the emphasis of autism spectrum disorders as a continuum of atypical social behaviors and the sexual heterogeneity of phenotypic manifestations, whether gaze processing constitutes an autistic endophenotype in both sexes remains unclear. Using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient and a psychophysical approach in a normal population (N = 128), here we demonstrated that individual differences in autistic traits predicted direct-gaze perception for males, but not for females. Our findings suggest that direct-gaze perception may not constitute an autistic endophenotype in both sexes, and highlight the importance of sex differences when considering relationships between autistic traits and behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12
JournalMolecular Autism
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Feb 12
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorders (ASD)
  • Autistic traits
  • Direct gaze
  • Individual differences
  • Sex differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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