Indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles for image-guided tumor surgery

Tanner K. Hill, Asem Abdulahad, Sneha S. Kelkar, Frank C. Marini, Timothy Edward Long, James M. Provenzale, Aaron M. Mohs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Detecting positive tumor margins and local malignant masses during surgery is critical for long-term patient survival. The use of image-guided surgery for tumor removal, particularly with near-infrared fluorescent imaging, is a potential method to facilitate removing all neoplastic tissue at the surgical site. In this study we demonstrate a series of hyaluronic acid (HLA)-derived nanoparticles that entrap the near-infrared dye indocyanine green, termed NanoICG, for improved delivery of the dye to tumors. Self-assembly of the nanoparticles was driven by conjugation of one of three hydrophobic moieties: aminopropyl-1-pyrenebutanamide (PBA), aminopropyl-5β-cholanamide (5βCA), or octadecylamine (ODA). Nanoparticle self-assembly, dye loading, and optical properties were characterized. NanoICG exhibited quenched fluorescence that could be activated by disassembly in a mixed solvent. NanoICG was found to be nontoxic at physiologically relevant concentrations and exposure was not found to inhibit cell growth. Using an MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft model in mice, strong fluorescence enhancement in tumors was observed with NanoICG using a fluorescence image-guided surgery system and a whole-animal imaging system. Tumor contrast with NanoICG was significantly higher than with ICG alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)294-303
Number of pages10
JournalBioconjugate Chemistry
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Feb 18
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Computer-Assisted Surgery
Indocyanine Green
Nanoparticles
Surgery
Tumors
Neoplasms
Coloring Agents
Dyes
Fluorescence
Self assembly
Infrared radiation
Hyaluronic acid
Cell growth
Hyaluronic Acid
Heterografts
Imaging systems
Animals
Optical properties
Tissue
Imaging techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Hill, T. K., Abdulahad, A., Kelkar, S. S., Marini, F. C., Long, T. E., Provenzale, J. M., & Mohs, A. M. (2015). Indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles for image-guided tumor surgery. Bioconjugate Chemistry, 26(2), 294-303. https://doi.org/10.1021/bc5005679

Indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles for image-guided tumor surgery. / Hill, Tanner K.; Abdulahad, Asem; Kelkar, Sneha S.; Marini, Frank C.; Long, Timothy Edward; Provenzale, James M.; Mohs, Aaron M.

In: Bioconjugate Chemistry, Vol. 26, No. 2, 18.02.2015, p. 294-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hill, TK, Abdulahad, A, Kelkar, SS, Marini, FC, Long, TE, Provenzale, JM & Mohs, AM 2015, 'Indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles for image-guided tumor surgery', Bioconjugate Chemistry, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 294-303. https://doi.org/10.1021/bc5005679
Hill TK, Abdulahad A, Kelkar SS, Marini FC, Long TE, Provenzale JM et al. Indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles for image-guided tumor surgery. Bioconjugate Chemistry. 2015 Feb 18;26(2):294-303. https://doi.org/10.1021/bc5005679
Hill, Tanner K. ; Abdulahad, Asem ; Kelkar, Sneha S. ; Marini, Frank C. ; Long, Timothy Edward ; Provenzale, James M. ; Mohs, Aaron M. / Indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles for image-guided tumor surgery. In: Bioconjugate Chemistry. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 294-303.
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